djdhays wants swarms

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Iddee, Feb 3, 2012.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    First, if you really want to expand, have 10 to 20 hives with frames and foundation ready to drop bees in at a moment's notice.

    Then call all your local exterminators and give them your information.
    Next, the same with all local tree cutters.

    A swarm in April can, in a good year, fill two deeps and 2 mediums before winter.
    Study cutouts and trapouts. They pay anywhere from 200 to over a thousand each. That can go a long ways toward buying equipment.

    Wait on foundationless until your hives are established and then feed them in one at a time, between drawn combs.

    Find a local fool, er, I mean beek, who will partner with you on cutouts. They are 5 times easier with two, and you will have someone to fill in when you aren't available. Once you do a few, offer free instruction on cutouts at your local club. ""free help"" You will have numerous takers.

    All bees swarm, treated or not. Most heavily treated commercial hives are not managed for swarm control. They are getting paid for pollinating and "maybe" a little honey, but the honey part isn't that important. In fact, many pollination jobs require feeding and never make honey.
    The best non-treated hives are taken from a house, tree, or out building where they have been for years.

    PS. Others are invited to add to this post.
     
  2. Robo

    Robo New Member

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    Real Estate agents are a good in for cut-outs. Bees can be the last thing between them and a closing. They don't have time to fool around, so if you make a good re-pore and are reliable, you will be their first call.

    And they pay well too.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Another thing to consider is when catching a swarm (perhaps more-so than a cut-out or trap-out) consider bringing them to a seperate yard than your home yard for a bit. I appreciate that for many this is not an option. While there is usually some history to a cut/trap-out ("been there for 5 years", etc.) there is not usually a lot of info on the origin of many swarms. Nothing like babying your yard and then introducing a possible health or attitude problem to it.
     
  4. djdhays

    djdhays New Member

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    I already have tree companies, fire and police departments on my list of people to call. I'm putting that off until mid to late march in the hope that they'll be less likely to forget me. I've put out the word on facebook and as I've said, I'm talking to all my friends and asking them to tell their friends. I hadn't considered exterminators. Wouldn't they consider me the competition? As I said before and I'll say again, I could be wrong but at least locally, I'm not likely to catch a treated swarm. A high school friend of mine who's been a long time member of the club I'm in and is currently the county bee inspector told me that to his knowledge, there's nobody raising bees close enough to me for their bees to be working in my back yard. To my knowledge there aren't any large agricultural farms in this area that would pay for pollination. There are several small apple orchards but nothing like the California almond industry. I should point out that your advice is appreciated and that I won't take anything for granted. Before I take any honey for human consumption from any hive, I'll know for certain that it's safe to do so.

    Space is not a problem. I own 6 acres and my mother owns almost 200 in 3 separate places where she said I'm welcome to set up hives. Her properties are all 25 miles from mine.

    Foundationless was not a moral decision or an informed decision that it was the best way to go. Foundationless was based on the knowledge that I could build the frames with the stuff I have and wouldn't have to buy foundation. As far as charging to remove hives, that may be something to consider down the road but not yet. I don't consider people who charge unethical by any means. I understand that time is money and you are providing a valuable service real or perceived and have every right to charge for your time but my goals for the short term are a little different. I got into this because I've always been fascinated by bees and always wanted to try keeping them. My loftiest goal initially was to help a dwindling wild population. That's not to say that I'm a die hard treehugger either. I have nothing against killing other living things if there's a valid reason to do so. I hunt things I can eat and I believe in capitol punishment. As I learn more about bees my goals have been set a little higher and I would like to eventually be able to sell some honey and spending time traveling the country and taking vacations while the girls work off the expense might even happen down the road. (no pun intended) For now my immediate goal is to see my first colony through the winter and be ready just in case everything goes right. I have no delusions that it will. Also, I don't want to get into the paperwork or record keeping that would be required to legally charge for my services. I am doing research to find out all I can about how to do cutouts / trapouts and as I think I've mentioned, I will have the opportunity to try at least one trapout in the spring. It's in an historical building in the city park north of me. Cutout is not an option. It's a very large park and I'm hoping they can help me out with the equipment to get me up the 25 feet to the hive entrance. If not, I'm going to have to get very creative.

    I guess the question I should be asking is, will foundationless frames work and do I have to use nucs? I have about 20 used frames I purchased that have new wax foundation in them. These were in a lot I bought off the widow that I talked about in my other post. I showed you the picture of the set up I have now.[attachment=0:phymkb5w]Project.jpg[/attachment:phymkb5w] Do you think I'd be better off to replace the deep box I have with a medium or two of wax foundation frames? Maybe I could put that medium foundation in the deep frames I have? With any luck, the colony I have will love building wax so much I can steal it to start other hives. Once I get them out of the bucket, i suppose I could try strapping some of that wax into some of those folding frames. I could build those. Maybe even do a cutout on the bucket when the weather breaks. Any input would be greatly appreciated. I would especially like to hear what you all think about whether I should cut them out of the bucket when the weather breaks or let them migrate down on their own in whatever set up I end up with.
     

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  5. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    just 10-20? If you advertize your services as widely as you suggest, you'll get 40-50 easy.
     
  6. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    Great info here, guys!! Thank you. I have a friend who owns the only local pest company in the county, and an good acquiantance at church who owns the most successful real estate company in the county, so there are 2 good options for me to explore. I plan on putting a couple of ads in the local paper in April and May as well. Come on calls!!!
     
  7. djdhays

    djdhays New Member

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    40-50? I better get busy building.
     
  8. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I'll tell you the truth on this, one pest control company got my number last year, and they were calling me with another cutout/trapout nearly every day.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've got a Hogan Trapout going, 8 ft up in a brick wall of a house about 20 miles away. (built my own from looking at the one at Kelley Bees) Hope to get to check on it in a day or 2.

    That might be an option for your park building, I hope to be able to catch the queen, after I add a frame of brood.
     
  10. djdhays

    djdhays New Member

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    The queen would be great. I'll be happy if I don't fall and break my neck. I've thought quite a bit about what I'll need to set up without damaging the building. I think it was Mike Tyson who said, "everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face."
     
  11. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    im useing the same trap on the church bees.the reason why im charging for removing bees....to buy new boxes an frames for the next bees (an a little money for your personal fund cant hurt im sure)....your time is worth money yes ??? spend your time well....use it to catch bees an let Dadent build the boxes/frames for a while....your goal is to help da bees yes ??? Help yourself help them...when your satisfied with your equipment amount....then you get to keep the money....you like money yes ???