Do I really need to treat??

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by queen_bee09, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. queen_bee09

    queen_bee09 New Member

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    Hello!
    We are in our first year of beekeeping, and we have 24 hives. I just recently found out that a beekeeper about 1/2 mile away from 16 of our hives us has some hives with american foulbrood. I'm not opposed to treating with a chemical when necessary, but I just want to know that theres no other option. So my question is, should I treat them with some terrmycin that I have as a precaution, even though they don't have it. Or is there some other way to help prevent this without the use of chemicals?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. BIGEDDIE

    BIGEDDIE New Member

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    I'm sorry I can't answer your question, I don't treat my bees at all but then again I don't have your problem. Do you know what your neighbor is doing with his hives. It would be interesting to find out.
     

  3. queen_bee09

    queen_bee09 New Member

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    As far as I know, he hasn't treated them for anything since hes had them which is either 3 or 5 years.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I don't know about Michigan, but in NC I would call the state inspector and they would no longer be there.
    I suggest you call yours and get them over there. Then make your decision.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Wow 24 hives in your first year thats a big bite to chew on. I sure would do as Iddee said. when the foul brood hives start to decline and the flow slows down there is a good chance that your bees may end up robbing out the hives with foul brood. How did you find out about his hives having fb. If you are good friends with him I would suggest talking to him about destroying the hives. If you havent talked to him personally than it may be hear say and nothing to worry about. Tough call on this one
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Not a tough call at all, if he is your neighbor just give him a call or visit. If your neighbor is uncooperative get the state inspector involved. Your neighbor should report it anyway just for this reason, that way if your apiary is registered he could call you and warn of an outbreak close by.

    There are many that have never seen AFB and how it can put a whole yard out of business, let alone you beek neighbors.

    AFB is nothing to fool with, the best remedy for it is to burn the entire infected hive. There is no treatment for AFB, the drugs will only mask the symptoms for a little while and then it will rear its ugly head again. Some beeks will only burn the frames and keep the bottom boards, boxes and covers..............be warned, take your chances. The spores can be viable for well over 20 years.

    Here is a good link to look at
    http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/pdfs/Diseases ... ees_PM.pdf
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Michigan does not have state inspecters.
    Treat with Terrmycin at the recommended rate to prevent AFB. Cheap insurance considering package and nuc prices not to mention wooden wear. Bee suppliers sell it premixed or you can buy it at TSC or Big Acres and mix a bag with 2 pounds of powdered sugar. Sprinkle it by the teaspoon on the back edge of the top bars. Terrmycin is considered a preventer of your bees getting AFB.
    Bee supply companys also sell Tylan an approvet antibotic for the treatment of AFB but beekeepers are abuseing it and useing it as a preventer instead of Terrmycin these days.
    According to Iddee a year or so ago when a question asked about AFB came up he replied all hives have it some what.

    You might want to contact Roger Sutherland thru sembabees.org and ask what your options are here in Michigan.

    Could be as simple as snot brood which lookslike AFB but doesn't string or stink.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  8. queen_bee09

    queen_bee09 New Member

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    Thanks for all of the replies! I have some terramycin already so I guess I'll pay him a visit and make sure its true before I treat them. I found out from my local woodenware supplier, but he said I didn't need to treat if they weren't showing symptoms. He kinda made it sounds like it wasn't a big deal actually, which suprised me. The neighbore is a pretty decent guy, so I'll talk to him about destroying his hives for the good of beeks around.
    Just out of curiosity what do us michiganders do when we have a situation that the old inspectors would have taken care of? They have to have someone in charge of these situations.
     
  9. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    If you are opposed to treating the bees, you can simply move your bees so that they are over 5 miles away from the afflicted hives... the farther away the better.
     
  10. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    How did you find that out? Did he tell you himself? What is he doing about it?

    One half mile is certainly close enuf for your bees to forage on his weak hives, ie rob them. I can see why you would be concerned. I would find out what I could about what the other beekeeper is doing about his problem, if he really has one. And I would tell him that if he isn't addressing his problem, then he isn't being a god neighbor.

    Your best bet would be to move your hives away from his. If he is harboring disease, in all likelyhood he isn't worried about anyone else getting it.

    Do we know all we need to know about this situation?
     
  11. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    He really said that? How dumb. Once you see symptoms it is most likely too late and TM or Tylan won't cure it. The infectious material will be in your combs and available to the colony to feed to the young larvae and continue the AFB cycle.

    Can you identify AFB? Do you know what it looks like? Have you seen it?

    Here is a good opportunity for you to learn something and to see AFB, assuming that your neighbor has it and hasn't burned it yet. If he does have AFB and hasn't burned it yet, which is what he should do, get him to show you what it look like. An educational opportunity.
     
  12. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    DON'T use any of your equipment when you look at his hive though... don't use your hive tool, don't use your gloves, or even your suit. That'd be a great way to spread it to your hive... go get yourself a disposable painter's suit, use some cheap mesh for a veil and nitrile gloves and wear those... then throw them away afterward.
     
  13. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Like I said contact Roger Sutherland the president of SEMBA and ask what your options are here in Michigan.

    :mrgreen: Al