Do you rearrange frames in a hive?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ski, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. ski

    ski New Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Do you rearrange frames in a hive?
    I have hives (2009 spring swarms) with 3 or 4 medium boxes with brood on one side (2-3 frames) in 2 or 3 boxes frames of honey scattered through out the boxes frames of pollen in one hive in the bottom box with a few foundation or empty drawn comb..
    I was thinking of moving frames of brood so it has 7-8 brood frames in the middle and a honey frame on each side of the brood. I was going to leave the frames of pollen in the bottom box but not sure what to do with the empty frames.
    Are there any general guidelines on moving frames other then do not break up the brood nest.
     
  2. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    IF there is no reason, I always make a point to put back the frames as they came out of the hive box. The bees spend great amounts of time and effort maintaining bee space, and haphazardly placing comb back in a box, out of order, increases the work they must do, besides killing bees as they are smashed, rolled, etc.

    Your questions however, is along the lines of perhaps times when it is needed for management and for the betterment of the hive. Some would say, leave them alone, the bees know best. But there are times when they get honey bound up against one side, etc. If bees did everything perfect, bees would not die on one side of the box by starvation while honey was on the other side. Or they would not paint themselves into a corner by honey or pollen bounding themselves. But they are insects.

    So while you do every day inspections, make sure your frames go back in the hive in the same order. But if you see a need, I would not hesitate to do what you feel best. You (or the bees) have ample time to move honey around, prepare for winter, and make any readjustment for a beekeepers mistake, if it happened to be the wrong choice.

    In another 6 weeks, my advice changes drastically to the "hands off" approach. Making changes to the brood chamber, where bees have not enough time to adjust, like fall and early winter prep, usually means screwing up the bees.

    Not being able to see your hives and I'm having a hard time picturing what your saying, and then the best advice is always to leave them alone. I'm not saying that for everything, but when in doubt, leave them alone. This is the first week of August, and they have time to adjust where they want things. And I say that, assuming it was not you through earlier manipulations, which caused any problems.
     

  3. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    sounds like you have what I refer to as chimmney brood, or the queen went and laid eggs everywhere other then the " assigned " brood chambers. I am a believer in queen excluders, avoids this entirely, some will say queen excluders are better named honey excluders, but I have not found that to be a issue for me personally, and would prefer to maintain the brood chambers for the queen, the honey supers for honey. as for manipulation of the frames you described--alittle late for that any fall flow if any will force the queen down eventually.
    Barry
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would work toward this goal.....

    honey on top and surrounding brood. Pollen beside brood, between it and the honey. Empty space "frames" below brood and honey.