Dogs- what to expect

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Hoborg, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    I have not had a dog for years in part due to my wife being allergic to most of them and enjoying the responsibility of no "kids" in the house. We both love dogs but have just chosen not to get one. To my surprise and pleasure, for my birthday my wife has gotten me a 10lb Yorkie. This is a low allergy non shedding breed.
    Now here is the question.
    My yard is very small and the two new hives I am in the middle of setting up will in a general sense be shared with the dog although the dog will be an inside dog, at times we will have her in the yard. What do you folks think I can expect and do you have any words of wisdom or deep concern for me to think about? I am pretty sure that the dog once knowing about going by a hive will end up not fun may learn to just stay away but still this is a mix I am unsure about.

    Give me your thoughts fellow Beeks.
     
  2. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    Dogs are smarter than you think. Once it takes a sting or two, it'll figure out a safe distance from the hives. Have a bit of benedryl liquid on hand just in case (may want to consult your vet for the proper dosage in the event of a sting).

    Our dog is a black Skye Terrier mix (looks like an oversized scottie). One event where she received several stings was all it took. She now stays about 10~15 feet away from the front of the hives.
     

  3. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    It may depend on temperament. My big, deaf, pit works the hives with me. He and the bees seem to have worked it out and seem happy to see each other. He walks right up to the entrance, the ladies maybe bump his nose a few times to say hi. But, then, he is not one to go snapping at flies and such. My wife's terrier would not likely live to see the next day.
     
  4. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    My Boston Terrier learned after one encounter last year. Took one more this Spring for "refresher training".
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    You'll have more trouble protecting her from the the male dogs than keeping her from the hives. :lol:
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    My 13 y/o cocker went to the hive once when he was 6 months old. He has not gotten within 50 feet of a white box since, whether full or empty.

    I will caution about one thing, tho. NEVER leave a dog without an escape route. If she is outside, leave the door open so she can get in. Guard pheromone stays on a dog same as on a human and can attract other bees.
     
  7. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    I am appreciating all your input. Several suggestions make lots of sense. I am going to check with my vet on the benedryl idea and any other concerns and making sure the pooch has an exit if stung. I may just be leading the way out myself.
     
  8. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    I have a rock terrie, and she learn quick to leave them along after getting stung a few times now she is after bumble bees the big kind, I think it will only take one time with them, I am trying to get her to leave them alone but to know avale.

    kebee
     
  9. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I have 2 great danes. The female it took one time around the hives to get stung and she figured out to stay away. The big dumb male on the other hand if I had a hive in the yard today he would go out and stick his noes in the entrance and take another sting. He just cant figure it out.
     
  10. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    Last year our 15 yo golden retriever came with me to see the bees, he got stung and headed back to the mule with the bees in chase. Boss lady was not happy since she was reading a book and did not have her veil on. It was the last time he went to say " hi " to the bees he would just hang out on the mule with the boss.
     
  11. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    These dog stories keep getting better and better. Funny how some get it right off and others just keep coming back.:dash1:
     
  12. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    If a very small yard .... , like Iddee said , make sure the dog can get away.

    We did a call to take a hive away from a beek who had a small yard that the bees turned on their dog after 2 years of living together , yard was too small for dog to escape. Hive was turned away from house , in a corner - everything correct, but something triggered them one day. Small as in 20ft by about 16 ...

    For a dog as small as a Yorkie, could also raise the hives up about 2- 3 ft and put something in front of hives so bees always fly up and away....
     
  13. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    As for my dogs , Golden's both came in with swollen faces, and our Labradoodle wont go near the hives , so she has also learned something.
     
  14. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    My hive in th 80's had a picket fence around it (for small kids) and I am thinking that perhaps I will need to put a mini board fence around this one for dog and critter proofing. Good idea.
     
  15. Beeracuda

    Beeracuda New Member

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    Bill hasn't paid any attention to the girls or them to him.

    DSCF1776.jpg
     
  16. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    I like the pic of Bill. I will show my wife to let her see how it can be.
     
  17. Beeracuda

    Beeracuda New Member

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    DSCF1795.jpg DSCF1811.jpg

    I don't think Bill even notices the bees. He just likes the fact that we are outside spending time with him!
     
  18. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a 6 ft privacy fence between my dogs and my bees. Every one of them snaps at bugs. My rotti mix came in with a swollen muzzle once but I think it was a yellow jacket in their water.

    My goat was on the lot with the bees, I put a barrier around her pen area that the bees COULD get through, if they hit the brakes and pulled their wings in, so they weren't pelleting her on their way to forage. I suspect she stuck her nose in a hive once, because she was content to watch me working them from about 10 feet away. And normally, if I was outdoors she wanted her nose in whatever I was doing.
     
  19. Hoborg

    Hoborg New Member

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    Yeah it is going to take an experience for some learning to take place.