Dont know what to do

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by wltwine, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. wltwine

    wltwine New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello folks I've got a situation happening and could use some help. I caught a swarm of honey bees on May7th, I placed the swarm in a Top Bar Hive, I decided to to a thorough hive check today and to my surprise I didn't see any brood, there are a dozen bars in this hive with beautiful comb honey and tons of pollen but no brood. I checked all but three bars and found maybe four or so capped cells and even they didn't look right. I looked for the queen but I didn't see her unless she on the last three bars, saw a lot of drones and workers. Is it possible for bees to swarm without a queen? the hive is full of bees but no brood I don't know what to do and could use some help, do I look for the queen again or just get a new queen and see what happens. any advice would be greatly appreciated. :confused:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Check the last three frames. If no brood, get a queen and introduce her. Most swarms replace the old queen they swarm with. Sometimes the new queen doesn't make it back from her mating flight. Also, a new queen may have just started laying on the last 3 frames.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    wltwine writes:
    I checked all but three bars and found maybe four or so capped cells and even they didn't look right.

    tecumseh:
    perhaps drone brood??? (which from egg to adult requires the most time) and just about the time the last drone brood emerges from the old queen is when you should expect to see the first signs of a new queen. just as a reminder once the new queen begins to lay it will take 3+ days until any easy to see larvae appears. without larvae or eggs the best sign is often time circular patches of polished cells on individual frames (and generally clumped together frame wise) which the workers are preparing for the new queen. for me these are quite 'obvious' first due to the sheen of the polishing and secondly because it appears the workers don't like to tread across these areas (it almost appears like there is some kind of 'wet floor' sign that only the bees can see).
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    There you go, another useful nugget of information I just picked up. Thanks.
     
  5. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

    Messages:
    583
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    now see...ya learn something new every day...wondered why the bees kept those really dark cells so squeaky clean...look like they been waxed (snicker)

    Seriously tho...i didnt know that but they are so clean its noticable...now i know why...thanks man ;)
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    you are of course welcome. I do believe once you begin to notice 'the small things' it does make bee keeping easier (at least on the head).
     
  7. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

    Messages:
    583
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    lol...i belive it does...there are lots of things i dont know or understand...mostly cause im self taught an i dont get to experiance things unless they happen to me...sometimes i see what bees do an i dont understand why...just that they do...i always wonder if my bees are gonna swarm...they say that they act funny and cover the outside of the hive just before they do...well my bees are always bunched up outside the hive...sometimes more, sometimes less...but they're always there...lots of stuff like that to learn :/