drunk bees

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by BRASWELL, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. BRASWELL

    BRASWELL New Member

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    We got some drunk bees out here. They fall out of the hive onto their backs, flip over and fly off. Not just one or two, every bee that leaves the hive does this. Whats up with that. RB
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If they are flying off probably nothing to worry about. I have watched hives that are very crowded at the entrances and seems like the field bees just can't get out the front door fast enough.

    If they were falling out and landing in the grass and acting drunk not ale to fly then I would think of pesticide poisoning.

    Maybe you just have some acrobatic bees.......show offs :lol:
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Fermented honey?? :Dancing:
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    there are some diseases (I want to say just off hand here one or two virus) where part of the symptoms are 'the bees appear drunk'. the one or two cases I have seen here the bees do not right themselves too quickly.
     
  5. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    I fed sugar syrup that I heated before I knew better years ago. Now they understand hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), is a by-product when sugar is heated. It is a neurotoxin that also affects people. It was considered as a possible cause of "Gulf War Syndrome" until the Corn lobby shut the study down. The process of HMF forming applies to all sugars.
    "HFCS forms hydroxymethylfurfural
    What these USDA researchers discovered is that when HFCS is heated, it forms hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a chemical that can kill honey bees. The production of HMF during cooking rose in parallel to the temperatures to which HFCS was exposed.

    To put it plainly, when you cook HFCS, it becomes contaminated with HMF. And according to the research, levels of HMF "jumped dramatically" when temperatures rose above 120 degrees Fahrenheit (which isn't very hot, by the way)."
     
  6. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Now, is this info for heated HFCS, or sugar? I'm confused.
     
  7. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    So, is this info about heated HCFS, or heated sugar? I'm confused.
     
  8. Jacobs

    Jacobs New Member

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    Also, is the study you refer to available on line? If so, can you provide a link to it? I would like to read it for myself.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have the same question as Hobie.... does overheating apply to sucrose or only hfcs?

    ps... much after the fact I reconsidered Braswell description and though that some robbing events might appear to the casual observer to be exactly as Braswell described.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  11. BRASWELL

    BRASWELL New Member

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    You guys are amazing. I learn here!! I will try to get you guys a video of these acrobatic bees. I have fed them no sugar. The food they have is what they have brought back to the hive This is the first box of bees removed from the NW Guilford County trapout 15 days ago. We have 2 more boxes of bees from this location, I need to see if they are dropping from the frames onto the bottom board like the first box. ___Next question, if we heat honey above 120 degrees is this same by-product produced?
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    the only reference I can find in my old acb/xyz is 'burnt sugar or syrup is liable to be fetal to bees'. no temperature is given and there is liable to be none since a candy board almost requires a good deal of heat. my loose understanding is you wanted to avoid caramelizing the sugar.

    another possibility.. I do know a migratory bee keeper who overwinters down on the Texas Gulf Coast who tells me that there is a yellow jasmine (vine I think) that bloom in the early spring there and it pollen when ingested gives the bees a drunken' appearance.