Dumb question

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by RE Jones, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I have removed all supers except for one on all of my hives, pushing them down, getting ready for "winter". Well, it is 86 degrees here today and I popped the tops on my hives and it looks like they have no place to store anything, yet they are bringing something in.

    Should I remove one or two frames from the super and replace with frames with drawn comb?

    I'm worried about them swarming(kinda weird this time of year), but I have removed several swarms in the past month from work.

    I would appreciate some feedback, Robert
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would remove up to 5 FULLY CAPPED frames of honey from each hive and freeze them. Keep them until Spring, feeding back any that may be needed. Extract what is left in the spring.
     

  3. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    Robert: Hopefully a more experienced FL Beek will correct me if I am wrong, but for me? I consider beekeeping in Florida a 12 month a year job. I do not winterize, other than considering making sure my hive entrances do not face North in case of a nasty cold front (and I may slide a board under a SBB if it looks like it's going to be really cold, but I remove them as soon as the weather moderates). In fact, I will be doing a couple splits next week. Our flow is getting ready to start! Just added a super to my 'weak' hive (they have only filled out 9 frames completely), and will be splitting my strong hives so I don't crowd them out when the flow begins. If you wait until "spring" (on the calendar), you will have missed our major flows of citrus, strawberries, etc..etc... I know you are a bit north of me, but honestly, I think you may be taking the winterizing thing too far for Florida (which may explain the superceding of all your hives this past season). I was told by a very credible Apiary inspector that hives in So FL can tollerate a split every 6 weeks or so...In your area, perhaps a bit less, but though it is JMO (which aint worth much, I admit), you are putting the kabosh on your bees. Let them do what bees do best, and give them room to grow! Keep them, and the Queen stimulated. My bees are bringing in pollen hand over fist, and have filled two supers with capped honey in about 3 months. I will be pulling half the super frames next week. I agree with saving a few frames of honey in the freezer just in case, but I tend to be a bit more 'free' with the bees, and respond/react when populations look low, or high, accordingly. Hope this helps! And by all means, I hope somebody in FL that may disagree with my approach will respond and correct my ways. Hope this helps! Happy bees make happy Beeks!

    Edited:
    Ps...The only stupid question is the one that wasn't asked, and a mistake was the result ....
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Good post:thumbsup:, But, this sounds strange to an old SW, Mo. beek. Your talking splits, supers full of honey, and putting more supers on already. Here were getting hives ready for ice stroms, snow, and sub zero weather. I'm Happy for you,But NO Fare.
     
  5. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    BrooksBeeFarm...Sorry for you!!! Northern weather sucks, which is why I am now in the South! And there is no doubt, we're kind of spoiled down here THIS time of year! When your flow is on, our bees will be doing backstrokes in the pool, dying for pollen.... It really IS all relative!! Keep the girls happy, and bee well!
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    first off there are NO dumb question..

    you could either do as Iddee suggest or add back on a box and see what happens. although I myself 'generally' remove excess space at this time of year there is some expectation in place (usually given the context of the local environment and what I see inside the hive) that a hive will either consume stores or if things are really crowed may need more room <so by and large at this time of year I am removing boxes but this is not some strict rule that has no exception.
     
  7. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    well, I like the question, it points out how south florida beeks have a hole set of problems northern states dont even have to think about, I keep 1 half full super on top of each hive, I wont put a empty 1 on this time of year with foundation that I save for the big flows but the 1 thing that is true you can say about florida is there is always something blooming, with the lack of rain things are slower then usual but soon as we get a wet day things will increase, even now my girls are bringing in something in the way of pollen.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    we are having a very unusual season here zookeep. at this date we have really had no winter and therefore the small hive beetle is still pretty active. no so active that I do not feed, but enough so that I would be weary of putting on any kind of 'pollen like' product. like yourself we still have stuff blooming and pollen coming in.... I noticed yesterday that the wild mustard in a place or so was blooming. we are also very dry but generally at this time of year with the wet also comes cold air.