DWV Photo?

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by Gypsi, Oct 15, 2013.

  1. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,752
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Found a bee walking in the apiary yesterday with a twisted wing. Not sure if the one I saw today was the same, but I brought her in and took her picture.

    I was concerned enough to drag into my bee meeting last night, looking like maybe these were the jeans I crawled around under the foundation in (in truth muddy dog did that but doing data entry for taxes does not require clean jeans), only to bump into Lee Burough and quiz him on IPM most ineffectually. His answers were much more concise than my questions.

    I did not do IPM this year, as my bees had a brood break of at least 3 to 4 weeks in May/June as I had pulled their comb, honey, brood and all to treat EFB more effectively. I do not have sticky boards under my sbb's, and at the moment it is cloudy and the IRS wants me, so I will be putting them tomorrow. I have not had a varroa problem as my location is somewhat isolated from other bees, and they have to catch them somewhere. When the inspector came out we went through 4 hives to find a varroa mite, on a drone brood. My chickens could deal with some tasty brood after this cold front passes, but before I risk rolling a queen going through hives, what the heck does this look like?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Looks like DWV to me!
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,752
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    38
    that is what I thought. which means what - I'm staring winter down the nose do I want to induce a brood break with powdered sugar? Tecumseh?
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have come to believe Gypsi that.... once you have planted your feet on a certain path that some things just go hand and hand and you will experience some things that are simply unavoidable. For folks like myself who have 'due to events way beyond are our making' find themselves on a treatmentless path for varroa just have to face up to the fact that you will see a bit more deformed winged virus and are likely to casually witness any number of other maladies casually associated with varroa.

    not to give away any 'industrial secrets' here.... we (meaning myself and a student at the bee lab) are performing some experiments with brood breaking and powdered sugar that I assume (at this time) will have some short term positive effect but in even a bit longer time line will prove to be mostly ineffective.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,752
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    38
    It is not a bad time of year to dust with powdered sugar? It worked really well used during a summer dearth, I cleaned up that 2nd hive of mine and got them going and growing before the great robout. Have not had to do it this year because of the EFB brood break and I had almost no varroa going into last winter, I just don't want to make matters worse for my bees.

    Do I dust or not dust, that IS the question. As soon as the cold front breaks, I will have a look and see which hives have the most problems. In the meantime I am going to try to get sticky boards into the ones I can tomorrow, and see what lands on my sticky.

    And no one taught me to dust with sugar, so I kind of used a soft paint brush and painted all the bees on the sides of the frames, Twice and there weren't any mites left with non hygenic bees. Might do it that way again
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,752
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Well, Tecumseh I got on here to see when I saw the DWV - and that would be October 15th. And I went to the bee meeting in October, but not in November, so I dusted with powdered sugar after that meeting, and there were tons of freshly hatched brood in the hive with the dwv and the most mites, and today, there were almost no bees. There was however a queen cell that had previously been occupied and successfully chewed open, and the youngest larva I saw was in the purple eye stage. Somewhere in North Texas I seem to have lost an old queen and the better part of a beehive. And a gap, tiny gap in the lid had dead bees in front of it on top of the inner cover, not sure if the cold got them or robbers came in that way but I am sure my former double deep is now distributed between the coolest tempered 10 frame and the nuc that got a new queen August 26th and was started then. I put a screen over the nuc and stacked 2 nuc boxes full of frames of stores with a few brood and a few bees on top, fondant below, to minimize conflict. Stuffed 5 frames full of pollen and nurse bees on the other quiet hive. That hot baby I brought from my neighbors got some fondant, I really don't want to build her up too much, it will be wanting a new queen early next year...

    As for my newly hatched queen she wasn't home, but we had a hard freeze on November 7th and purple eye stage on the one larva, the old queen was still there 10 days ago? that would be after the drones were all kicked out. I don't know if there were any workers gone to forage today, looked like just a few nurse bees holding the fort down and a lot of robbers, almost no brood, so I pulled the entire hive after I split everything up. Will go out in a few and have a look. If I find the queen sitting where the hive was, what do I do with her?