Educate me on honey production

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by ASTMedic, Jul 13, 2013.

  1. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    So I've been feeding my bees since the end of April when they were installed. Through my reading I've gathered that the bees will turn that sugar syrup into a form of honey thus the reason we don't feed with supers on.

    So if they will store syrup as honey why do I have so little capped honey in my hive? I do see stored syrup in open cells but no capped honey. Could it be that I've been blocking good air flow with the top feeder?
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Tell us more about what the bees are doing........are they pulling comb at this time also, it takes quite a bit of energy and resources to do this.

    Is this a package, nuc or swarm you started out with this year or an established colony from last year?

    Are the frames drawn comb, foundation, or foundationless?

    Need just a little more background.

    If you are wanting honey a strong colony in needed, a good flow and plenty or room for them to spread nectar out.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Brood rearing burns through the stores. Has the hive increases in size the stores will increase if you are feeding. I keep feed on until they have 2 deeps drawn comb and heavy. I dont worry to much about how much is capped. There will be plenty of capped stores when brood rearing slows down.
     
  4. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    It was a Nuc from this year. They're still drawing frames out but also storing nectar and pollen very well.

    I'm not looking for honey for me. I know that's not expected in a first year hive. I'm just wondering about them building stores for winter.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    You mentioned they are still pulling comb. It takes about 10lbs of honey to make a pound of wax :thumbsup:
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    imho.... honeybees will not cap or uncap honey until that is essential. it might be a bit like putting money used for emergency purpose into or out of a safety deposit.... neither is done routinely or without cause.

    I would suspect that the first season you experience a major flow with a good population of bees you will then see how quickly honey can be capped.

    flow of air may effect the time required to cure honey but it should not really impact whether the honey get capped or not capped.
     
  7. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Ok thanks for those lessons.

    Will they tend to increase capped food stores as the weather starts to turn cool? Just trying to learn what I need to do to help get them through their first winter. Not that winters are super harsh here but 20's at night are usual.

    Tecumseh:

    So with the cap uncap statement are you saying they would rather store nectar open for easy access that cap it to become honey?
     
  8. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    The honey is ripe and ready before it is capped. Capping is sealing the honey up for future use
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    As the hive increases and draws more frames of comb before cold weather stes in, i would start feeding 2 to 1 sugar syrup, they will store 2 to 1 and use 1 to 1 to draw comb and brood raising. Jack