Effect of Stacked Insecticidal Cry Proteins from Maize Pollen on Nurse Bees (Apis mel

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Americasbeekeeper, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

    Messages:
    1,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Effect of Stacked Insecticidal Cry Proteins from Maize Pollen on Nurse Bees (Apis mellifera carnica) and Their Gut Bacteria
    The objective of this study was to analyze the response of nurse bees and their gut bacteria to pollen from Bt maize expressing three different insecticidal Cry proteins (Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, and Cry3Bb1). During their 10-days life span, the consumption of Bt maize pollen had no effect on their survival rate, body weight and rates of pollen digestion compared to the conventional maize varieties. Bacterial population sizes in the gut were not affected by the genetic modification. Surprisingly, Cry proteins from natural sources, most likely B. thuringiensis, were detected in bees with no exposure to Bt maize. The natural occurrence of Cry proteins and the lack of detectable effects on nurse bees and their gut bacteria give no indication for harmful effects of this Bt maize on nurse honey bees.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0059589
     
  2. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I think that's good news, I need a translator to be sure. :)
    Its a GMO crop, but a least it isn't killing honey bees.
    Are there other beneficial insects that use maize pollen as a protein source?
    Probably, not many after the neonictoids.

    An interesting aside:
    The flight cages used in this study forced the bee colonies to cover their protein demand exclusively from pollen of a particular maize variety (treatments BT, DKC, BEN). Interestingly, the gut of nurse bees from colonies of the free-flying foragers (treatment PHA) also contained some maize pollen, indicating that bees actively forage on pollen of this wind pollinated crop even with abundant access to alternative pollen sources [12].