Electric fence

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by PerryBee, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I'm in the process of installing one at one of my yards where a bear has been spotted recently. The directions call for the ground rod to be driven into the ground at least 6 feet! :shock:
    I bought a purpose rod that is 6 and a 1/2 feet long, but how on earth would some one ever remove it if you wanted to move the system?
    A farmer nearby tells me he only uses a 3 foot chunk of copper pipe, and says 6 feet is not necessary.
    Anyone with experience in this?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Depending on the area, it needs to reach below the dry dirt and contact wet soil. You drive it down farther and buy a new one when moving the fence, or hook a chain to it and use the tractor 3 point hitch to pull it.
     

  3. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    You can easily pull the ground rod with a chain and anyone's front-end-loader. In my area, if you're going six feet deep, you are going to need a drill. It's hard to hammer a smaller diameter rod through a limestone rock. In your area, I would think a three foot copper rod would be sufficient.
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Three feet deep for copper in your soil should probably be more than adequate.
    ​Six feet is so that the bear can't pull it out. :lol::rolling::rotfl:
     
  5. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    A bear smart enough to know that removing the ground would interrupt the circuit. What a bear and what a great sense of humor Ef has. A good sense of humor indicates a happy man. Good on you Ef, and good on us for having your wisdom and humor on this forum.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hey, hey, smarter than your average bear?
    [video=youtube;_gMC11x1luA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gMC11x1luA[/video]
     
  7. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Depends on how damp your soil is and how conductive. I am in a lot of clay and damp. I have used coils of old roadside galvanized guy wire and burried them bringing one end up for connection. Good ground!
     
  8. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    I use 3-4 pieces of rebar. Hook them together and then to the charger. I get a very good ground. the rebar is about 2 -3 feet long. When I move the yard I just drive the rebar into the ground and forget about it.
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    It is not only length of the ground rod but also surface area exposed to the soil, that is why in the electrical code it called for 6 ft of ground rod. If it could not be provided in one length multable ground rods could be used and tied together. In construction now galvanized plates are are berried used for grounds instead of rods as they provide a greater surface area. Rebar will work for ground rods but as it rusts the rust can create a insulation barrier causing the ground to become less effective.

    Mesh wire rolled out (like stucco wire) along the ground will keep them from digging under the fence. tie it to the ground wires and the bear standing on the grounded mesh is sure to receive the full capacity of the fencer regardless of the ground conditions.
     
  10. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Whichever way you ground your fence MAKE SURE IT IS ON.
    Recently i disconnected fencer to fix the fence, and forgot to turn it on before leaving. Racoons came and had a party in my bee yard.
    Destroyed 3 deeps of honey I prepared for new splits, plus 12 deeps of fully drawn wax, honey supers I was going to put on.
    Also 16 deeps of drawn frames/brood frames from last winter deadouts.
    Needles to say how I felt.

    RACOON ATTACK.jpg
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Looks more like a bears work to me MarBees? i've had little coon problems in my bee yards and we have alot of coons. Never seen coons tear hives apart like that, I have 3 sweet corn fields out and they almost destroyed one of them before i got a 4 wire elec. fence up. They got 4 ears of corn to my one:shock:, out of a acre field, needless to say the people at the farmers market were unhappy (and I ). I have live traps and catch between 20 to 30 per year, i then let Mr. Remington take care of them.:thumbsup: Jack
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Racoons, I hate em. Last night I left a bunch of fantastic looking beeswax that I had just melted in my solar melter in a bucket of water (keep the ants off it). This morning I found half of it removed from the bucket of water and half of that was eaten! :shock:
    Just little pieces and flat scraps left on the ground.
     
  13. marios

    marios New Member

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    conduit pipe makes a good ground , it is very difficult to ground off of rebar or anything that is rusty i use 3 -4 feet works well , we have bears here, i use deep cell marine batteries and change them every two weeks for the outyards. it is easier to put in 2 3 foot pipes 2 feet apart than 6 feet. will have to make a valley run in the fall.
     
  14. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Sorry to hear that Perry. :sad: Looks like a bear work Jack, but it was coons, bear goes first to occupied hives, they enjoy eating bees as well as honey.
    All the plastic frames were scraped clean, something bears don't bother doing and my wooden frames had only wire left, like somebody cooked them in a steam melter.
    As for grounding fence I have three six feet 1" galvanized bars, as per instructions from my Zareba fencer.
     
  15. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    If you can't drive a ground rod deep enough, a flat piece of copper (or other conducting metal) buried and wired to the system works too. I ran into this problem a few times when I was in the Army, and setting up a field headquarters.
    If nothing else, get in touch with Omie and have her send you some of her magic bear proof green paint.:lol:
     
  16. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Weld a small stainless steel or galvanized bolt to the side of the rebar as a rust free connection point. The rust on the buried part will have no more electrical resistance than the earth it contacts.