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I got started last August with 2 hives and have learned a lot this year. Both hives made it through the winter and survived a bear attack this spring. Unfortunatly I had the bear return the next night and I lost 1 hive. I caught a swarm from a friends farm and think I lost the queen. I brought a couple of frames of brood and eggs over to it from the strong hive this weekend.

Now the problem: I put a honey super on the strong hive last week with a queen excluder and there are very few bees in it and they haven't started to even draw out comb. Do I remove the excluder?

On my new hive should I try combining it with the strong hive and then order a queen and split it later this sumer or just hope they make a queen?
 

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If your strong hive has a few frames of sealed--only sealed brood place the sealed brood in the honey super and replace the brood frames with frames from the honey super the brood frame will draw bees into the super, the emerging brood( bees ) will be right about where they belong cleaning and polishing the cells, and migrate down to attend to brood in the lower chambers ( brood chambers ). As for the split, check for eggs and larvae in all stages of developement, if none immediately provide brood to prevent laying workers--if that occurs they will never accecpt a true queen. in the interm order a queen of the variety you want to populate the hive italian, starline, whichever you prefer, and if queen cells become present either destroy them or use them in yet another colony you want to start, introduce the new queen in the perscribed manner.--this is what I would do others may disagree.
Barry
 

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Never put foundation above an excluder. Drawn comb will work, but they are very reluctant to draw comb . Remove the excluder until they are drawing 2 or 3 combs, then replace it if desired.
 
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