Entrance reducer ideas

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Zulu, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Need to close off a hive but don't have a reducer at hand

    Many of you might already have the right tool , but just dont know it

    IMG_5346.JPG
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :rolling: I just bet you have a bunch of those "tools" too! :lol:
     

  3. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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  4. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Us BEER drinkers just use a hand full of grass:)
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    works for me zulu, that is way funny! :lol:
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    hopefully zulu those are corks to bottle of mead.

    I caught an idea from an old beekeeping magazine some time back and often make entrance reducer from the top bars of old and disfunction frames. cut them to whatever length you need, cut a notch for the entrance and slide then into place. this idea was originally presented to the magazine a good number of years ago by Jeffrey Todd who was a beekeeper from over in the Austin, Texas area.
     
  7. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I found out what it is like to not have entrance reducers when you really need them. We got into a community robbing spree when pulling honey and most of the hives had wide open entrances. We stuffed weeds but my son,s bee yard is literally full of poison ivy that you dont want to handle much. Am going to make some bottom boards with a bit higher rim so will need higher reducers. Supposedly some advantage to having a bit more lounging space at the bottom of frames and I know it will make it easier to slide in my oxalic vaporizer.
     
  8. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    In the heat of Texas, I've used a strip of hardware cloth (half moon shaped viewed from the side). It reduces the entrance to any size I want, yet allows good ventilation. :)
     
  9. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    I use that to close hives / nucs when bring swarms home, works very easily, also easy to take out again.
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Same thing for moving hives into pollination, etc. :thumbsup:
     
  11. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    I make mine out of 1 1/2" square blocks they are strong enough that they don't break when they get stepped on. The 2 notched for the bees are in the center of the block with one opening 2 1/2" by 3/8" and the other is 1/2" by 3/8". They are heavy enough that mice can not move them to get in the hive.
     
  12. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I uses pieces of stone tile, that's what was closest to hand at the time.