Entrance reducer

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by crazy8days, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Was wondering what to look for when it is time to change size of opening or remove completely the entrance reducer. My new hives are at the point they are walking all over each other to get out. could i turn the reducer to the larger notch or remove completely?
     
  2. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    I say turn it upside down and join the upside down club... P5040076.jpg
     

  3. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I'm with medic on this one! :)
    but I tuck mine in a bit more so there is only one opening
     
  4. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    I'd remove them, but I tend not to use them much to begin with.
     
  5. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I removed a couple on hives are booming....plus, it was very warm the week I removed them. I wanted more ventilation besides relieving congestion.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :lol: Medic, just using the words "upside down" acknowledges that they are not "right side up". :lol:

    Like the rest, simply switch to the next largest opening or remove altogether. I rarely use the "smallest" opening, even in winter. Middle size opening and then remove 'em.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I had one of those one time. It may still be in the shed somewhere. I might use it in the winter if I was a member of the tundra division.
     
  8. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Is that how they do it in the Land Down Under? aka Australia?:lol:
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If the bees are "walking all over each other to get out", that's a sure sign you''ve got a honey flow running. Open the door all the way and let them move without crowding. They also need the room for ventillation--to cool the hive and the evaporate the nectar (they go together). As an "aside em" allow me to say that the entrance block you have is nice to look at, but any piece of wood that fits the opening is equally good. Cut it or break it to expose as much or as little of the passsage way as you want. You'll find it a lot cheaper but just as good. :rules:
     
  10. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    srvfantexasflood said:
    "Is that how they do it in the Land Down Under? aka Australia?"
    that's how they do it in NEW YOUR CITY :lol:

    crazy8, ef 's post is a good post. i would open the door all the way. ef said: "any piece of wood that fits the opening is equally good. Cut it or break it to expose as much or as little of the passsage way as you want. You'll find it a lot cheaper but just as good."

    i have used lathe in a pinch when i couldn't find the ones i made or bought stored in iddee's shed :lol:
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Addendum: If you want (for esthetics or any other reason) to have the entrance in the middle, just break your stick in half and place each half starting from the side.
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have found scrap 1x2 is just the perfect height, and a 6 inch piece here, a 4 inch piece there, or an 18 inch piece with a right side opening, the bees adapt just fine. Just so it's not treated wood.

    gypsi
     
  13. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Removed the reducers. Bees thanked me.
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    describe what happened when you did :grin:

    if you put your face down close to the hive opening when the bees are fanning you will feel the draft of air on your face and hear the sweet humming of their wings....
     
  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm not trying this without a veil!
     
  16. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    I was wondering... entrance reducers force the bees to enter from one side. I noticed my packages of bees favor the foundation on the side of the hive where the entrance reducer opening was. It forces the beekeeper to shift empty frames around to get the bees to fill them all out. Would it be better to do like efmesch suggested, or is it a good thing they are building on the side? Would it be better if they started in the middle and fanned out? Or would they want to go straight up? Or, was this all just a coincidence?:???:
     
  17. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You are right - brood nest is by the front door in my hives. Hmmm...