Equipment

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ghost95, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. ghost95

    ghost95 New Member

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    Hello all.

    I'm looking to start a colony this coming spring. Nothing big, a single hive. I would like to harvest honey but not much, just enough for a family of 3 or 4.

    Do you all have any suggestions for what equipment I need to begin? The kits seem to have have alot that I might not need. I am trying to keep costs down but not being cheap.

    Also which suppliers have you all had luck with as there are thousands of them out there (it seems)?

    Thanks in advance for your help.
     
  2. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    This is a good start. About a month after you install your bees, you will need a second deep, about a month after that, you'll need a super. The super is your harvest. Don't expect much honey (if any) the first year. https://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_ ... cts_id=945
     

  3. ghost95

    ghost95 New Member

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    Thanks. I'm not in a hurry to harvest. I would like to do this right and get a little though. I understand the first year would be small if anything at all.

    I'd hate to kill a colony by messing something up. So I want to be careful with whatever I do.
     
  4. brendantm130

    brendantm130 New Member

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    This is my second year. I had 5 hives that made it through winter, all 2 deeps and one medium. One hive never grew at all, two only needed 1 med super for honey, one needed 3 med supers, and one crazy hive needed 7 mediums, and 1 deep (I ran out of mediums). What I'm trying to say without bragging too much, you may need more equipment than you expect.

    Also, buy what you think you need all at once to save on shipping. Good luck.

    My daughter and I are having a lot of fun.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    start with the stuff you will need for yourself... a veil, gloves, a hive tool and smoker. then the choices begins as to what kind of box you want to keep the hive in and whether you want to 1) buy an existing hive 2) buy a nuc or 3) a package. if you pick door number 3 you want to get that ordered early... there should be sources just north of you in south Georgia if you wanted to keep it fairly local and close. some of these sources may also have equipment for sale.

    I think there was a thread (from a year or so back where we covered) something like the same question????? drawing a blank on the title right now... must be the heat and not my age huh?
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a brendantm snip:
    My daughter and I are having a lot of fun.

    tecumseh:
    that's what I like to hear.
     
  7. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Ghost, welcome to the forum. :hi:

    All good advice so far. I would add a good introduction beekeeping book such as Beekeeping for Dummies or similar.

    Since you're east of the Mississippi, Brushy Mountain may have free shipping in December. Also, I think Mann-Lake has free shipping on orders over $100 (with some items excluded). As always, check the prices and shipping to see if it really is a "deal".

    Be sure to check out the "Trading Post" section of this forum. Might just be some bees and equipment for sale there.

    Enjoy your beekeeping journey.

    Walt
     
  8. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Welcome to the forum ghost95:
    You are starting out the right way, learning all you can before starting your bees. Craigs list is a good place to look for equipment. You can also go on line and look for beekeeping clubs/associations in your area.
    As far as this forum goes, don't be afraid to ask questions. There are people here from all over the world, and we learn from each other. Good luck.
     
  9. ghost95

    ghost95 New Member

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    Thanks guys. So far I am looking at 8 frame mediums. If I understand correctly to start I need a lower box for the bees and two uppers for honey, one of which would hold extra harvest and the other for the bees to eat. Is that the "simple " idea?
     
  10. ghost95

    ghost95 New Member

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    Also I am planning on starting with a Nuc.
     
  11. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    With mediums the bottom three are for the bees.

    The queen will start in the bottom box, then move up to the second box as summer progresses, she will often go into the third box and lay brood also.

    As you know honey and pollen will be scarrterd thru the three box's.

    This is info for 10 frame mediums, 8 frame she may go higher ?

    Murrell
     
  12. ghost95

    ghost95 New Member

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    Man, there are so many configurations. What I want is a single colony that can be managed semi-easily. I would like to be able to harvest some honey over the season but I am not looking to fill a 55gal drum.

    Here is another Idea.
    2 deeps on the bottom
    1 queen excluder
    2 or 3 supers (Mediums)for honey storage. (for me and the bees)
    All 8 frame boxes
    Starting with a nuc

    Is this about right for what I am looking to achieve?
    What would you guys recomend to achieve my goals above?
     
  13. rast

    rast New Member

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    As you can see from brendantm130's post, starting with only 1 hive could be disappointing, it might be the weak one. If you can start with two hives, for numerous reasons.
     
  14. rast

    rast New Member

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    I am the odd man out here on frame size. I do run primarily 8 frame.
    Your configuration would be fine depending on physical ability as far as the bees are concerned with new hives. Problem is swapping frames around later as you grow. And if you enjoy it you will. I have become a firm believer in in brood and honey supers being the same size.
     
  15. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    add a top and bottom and your list sound about right. some folks here will encourage you to use the excluder and some will not. even though I promote excluder use in year one you would be better off to not use it at all.

    8 frame equipment <girly men stuff :Dancing:

    jumbo depth <only Arnold could heft that stuff :roll:
     
  16. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I think your biggest mistake is starting with one hive. I would not recommend starting with no comparison hive.

    With two hives, you can compare them and see if one is not doing well. You can take from one to assist the other. There are many advantages of having more than one your first year.
     
  17. ghost95

    ghost95 New Member

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    Why wouldn't you use an excluder? Isin't that how you seperate the laying chamber from the honey/harvest area...not including what is packed around in the lower chambers? Won't the queen use all the chambers to lay in if she can?

    Also I have been reading the Backyard Beekeeper. Are there any other beginer books that I should look in to? Thanks.
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    "Why wouldn't you use an excluder?"

    An excluder can be help or harm. In the hands of a new beek, it will most likely be harm.

    When bees cap and store honey, they start at the top and work down. The brood will be in the bottom section of the honey. If there is not a full frame depth of capped honey above the brood, there is no excess honey for the beekeeper. When there is enough for the beek to harvest, the brood will be below the honey super.
     
  19. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    A bit of panic in the lat post? Relax. There's just lots of information to absorb and some preconceived notions to look at again.

    I have Kim Flottum's book, The Backyard Beekeeper, and think it's fine. Like everything else, the more you learn, the better you are. It was the first book I bought also. :) You've got lots of time, enjoy.

    Walt
     
  20. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    Go to your local Public Library;

    They have or can get you beekeeping books thru Inter-Library Loan.

    I live out side city limits so I have to pay $15 a year for membership, wish I could make more investments that payed off as well !

    Try to join a local bee club if there is one, find a local beek, probably one in a 1/4 mile, ask the Sheriff, or cop if they know of any, visit the State-County agriculture dept. in the County seat, another good source for finding a local beek, is your preacher [ our Methodist Preacher is a beek ]

    Read & learn all you can, and REMEMBER it is a HOBBY, you will goof-up and you will do great !

    Good Luck, and ask questions here, some of the answers may even be correct !! :yahoo:

    Murrell