estimating hive populations

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by lil grain of rice, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. lil grain of rice

    lil grain of rice New Member

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    Roger Morse suggests that a hive of 50-60k is about the most efficient size. Be that as it may, how would anyone go about estimating the population of a hive, short of weighing the hive with and without all the bees (which would be heck on that love/trust relationship with the bees :lol: )
     
  2. Charles

    Charles New Member

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  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    lil'grain writes:
    Roger Morse suggests that a hive of 50-60k is about the most efficient size.

    tecumseh:
    are you certain the proper turn of words isn't 'the most effective size' for capturing the largest surplus on a KNOWN honey flow*. which still leaves me kind of scratching my head somewhat.

    efficiency is really a physical science term which suggest some fixed imput's capacity to generate some output. add $ for cost of input and $ for output and you have moved from efficiency and into the world of economics.

    the number almost has to be some wild ass guess which would be my own wild ass guess. I tend to think such numbers are more brag and oh wow than factual since you would need one queen who laid constantly for quite some time at the very maximum capacity of ALL queens (+3 standard deviations) to get to this number. you could of course get to this kind of number (as was the case of a lot of old section honey comb producers) by running multiple queen hives.

    *all honey flows are not created equal. some are punctuated and some are constant this FACT standing by itself should suggest that there really ain't no such thing as a one size is the most efficient size everywhere.