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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
3' off the ground. How would you hive this to get them to adapt to conventional frames over a period of time? And I worried about my bees in their nice warm boxes.




 

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Why over a period of time? I would just shake them onto 8 frames of drawn comb, then cut what brood comb I could and tie it in frames. Shouldn't be more than one or two frames of brood to tie in. Then feed sugar water and pollen sub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was looking for the easy way tomorrow. Cut the limbs, and put the whole shebang in a box with an excluder and probably a spacer under it, a box of drawn comb and a lid on top.
Deal with the comb separation when I have more time.
 

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Just be ready to deal with a ton of burr comb. They will build new comb next to the old comb first and move up to the newer stuff slowly.

I'm with Iddee on this one, all of those little branches are a real pain to deal with. Take a sharp pair of trimmers with you to remove them and then tie into frames.

G3
 

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G3, have you never harvested 60 lbs. of honey with a machete?? It's fun. Don't take all his enjoyment away. :lol:
 

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Can't say that I have, sounds a little messy to me.

Have fun with it rast and let us know how it turns out.

G3
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It went real easy. Very docile, hard to believe they survived the rain, sleet, and freezing temps. I hung part of a pollen patty on the branch.





Their new home, 6 miles away


Looking out their front porch
 

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HAHA a bee bar-b-que. :lol: :lol:

Well that is one for me to add to the books, never thought about doing it that way.

G3
 
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