extracting

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by denise, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. denise

    denise New Member

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    hi can you please tell me how to tell if your honey is ready for extracting
    thanks denise
     
  2. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    If the cells are capped, it's ready. If the cells aren't capped give the frame a "sling" test. Hold The frame tightly above the super, and give it a flip or sling with your wrists-being very careful not to let go of it. If it "slings" out it's not ready yet.
    You can also check the honey with an instrument called a refractometer. This measures the moisture in the honey. It should be 18% or less.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    If 90 % of your frame is capped it is usually safe to extract, plus, what Gunny said! :thumbsup:
     
  4. denise

    denise New Member

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    hi thank for advice have done the shake test and seemed ok just wanted to make sure
    thanks all denise
     
  5. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Like may other things, it's a bit regional. If you have high relative humidity then the honey will also have more water in it. In our area it's very dry and capped honey tends to be about 15% water. So we tend to extract the frames when they are about 50% capped, that way the blend of capped and uncapped honey gives us around 16 or 17% water. In your region you likely want a higher proportion of capped to uncapped. A refractometer is not expensive and easy to use. Takes the guesswork right out of it.
     
  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    STOP ---- STOP ---- STOP.. ... . Denise . . . :eek:

    Think very carefully before doing any extracting at your location.

    The seasons here are weeks behind normal. There is usually a "June Gap" when the Spring flowers have finished and the Summer flowers haven't started (July). The "Gap" can be fierce and if it coincides with a spell of bad weather !!. The bees could need all the honey they have amassed. It is not unusual for colonies to starve to death in a bad year.

    Perhaps you should check with your mentor.
     
  7. denise

    denise New Member

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    hi barbarian they still have plenty of honey i another super but this one is that full its stopping bees from getting up to other super and there is comb building up into top super only looked last thursday but its all capped now