Extractor design features?

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by Bee n There, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. Bee n There

    Bee n There New Member

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    Just in the thinking stage of designing and building an extractor and hoped to get some experienced feedback on the good and poor features of comercial units.

    I am gravitating to an upright radial design in the 16 to 32 frame size range with a ~2hp DC motor with variable speed controller.

    Have machiening and welding equipment on hand and have fabbed enough stuff out of metal to feel this is doable for me.

    Priced out new stainless, not cheep, but I think I can put together motor, controller and the materials for about $1000 wich is well less than it would cost to get into a new unit.

    Any thought on features you wish your extractors had or things that you are glad the do have?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Sorry, never had a power extractor, so can't help there.

    I do wonder about what you will have invested once you add steel, stainless welding supplies, hardware, travel, utilities used, ETC. Can you even earn 10 cent per hour by making it?
    Compared to this....

    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/21 ... tinfo/814/
     

  3. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I think it would be a big plus to have a selectable automatic speed program from slow start, increase, hold and auto shutdown timer with maybe an emergency acoustical or vibration shut down.
    That would free the operator to do other tasks rather than having his hand on the controls.
     
  4. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    iddee, you have neglected to include the "fun factor" and sense of pride of designing your own stuff. This outweighs a significant amount of dollars for us mechanical tinkerers.

    Of course the same applies for people who spend way more time and money than can be justified making soap, wine, mead... etc., etc.
     
  5. Bee n There

    Bee n There New Member

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    Exactly, for the honey quantity we had this year the borrowed electric 4 frame I refurbished worked just fine. Even could clean up an old 4 frame hand crank but that would be some workout.

    We priced around a bit and by the time taxes and shipping were covered it would be in the range of $1750 to get a reasonable sized but basic radial electric. If it was just about getting something to do the job could shop around for something used, but that does not do much for justifying shop tools or creative urges.

    Made a heated decapping tray/wax melter this summer and likely the biggest expence was welding gas, to buy something functionally equivilent would have been close to $1000 by the time it was shipped and taxes paid. Around here shipping and taxes are killer, example costs as much in shiping and taxes for an unassembled deep box as the box it's self.

    Being able to push a button and have it start spinning at low rpm and slowly winding up to a couple hundred before shutting down would be nice and not overly complicated to achieve. DC motor and controller would be the way to go for that and should be able to dig up a treadmill motor and controller board for the job.

    To me there looks to be a big quality difference between the extractors that are made out of a roll crimped light gauge stainless and the ones welded up out of 16ga 304s.
     
  6. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    A friend has a program on his laptop that controls his saws. It should be fairly simple to sense the resistance and increase the speed as the honey is flung out. The simple solution would be to create a map and just increase at the fixed rate.
    If you cannot build a stainless extractor for half of $1750 you will lose money in any metal business. I have enough scrap from previous projects around here.
    I would add a heated water jacket to make the honey flow better without overheating and possibly evaporate a little moisture.
    I see a jacketed extractor in Honduras at COAPIHL when I go down there. It is not that honey does not run when it is 95 or more outside. It evaporates moisture for them.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    sounds like my kind of fun! I am dutifully waiting on pictures???
     
  8. Bee n There

    Bee n There New Member

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    I like the water jacket idea, a false bottom with an inch or so of space for a hot water element would do.

    I am not trying to compete with the extractors that can be had for a bit over a grand, just trying to find a way I can get some of the functionality and durrability of something more along the line of a Maxant 4000. Looking at that sort of unit I think there is money to be saved granted it is likely to take a week or two of spare time.

    Also having quite a bit of scrap and parts about will help, but I am kind of too the point that on real projects I order what metal I need free deliveries every Tuesday, lol even down my one lane gravel road. Working with scrap metal is sometimes just not worth the hastle.

    Will have to get back into my photobucket account and upload some pictures.
     
  9. Bee n There

    Bee n There New Member

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    Here is a sketch of the idea I have been playing with added a water jacket.

    Fixed shaft through the center and the motor drops down with a lovejoy coupling so makes for easy cleaning and access to the drum. Also would be easy to pull off the frame cage and replace it with a screened cage for spinning cappings.

    Will be a few fancy sealed bearings or bushings involved.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    I have been pricing extractors recently and have looked at some of the designs people have come up with on youtube in hopes of finding a method a little cheaper. Some of the ideas I have seen are actually quite funny. Foodgrade materials are very important in considering what you want your honey to come in contact with, yet I saw people using plastic and tin garbage cans. These materials have oils and chemicals which leach out. I would figure stainless is safest and would imagine even some woods would work well although harder to clean. I'm sure our ancestors had little to choose from. Has anyone ever seen any antique extracting equipment? Does anyone know how they did it? :dontknow:
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Just a "convenience" thought: Do you think a honey pump attached to the exit hole or somewhere along the system would be a worthwhile addition. From my experience, the honey often exits the extracter too close to the floor and if there were a pump to help pipe it up, things could be a bit easier when it comes to filling the large containers with honey.