Fall Is Coming

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Walt B, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    If the temperature dropping into the mid-90's isn't enough to tell you Fall is on the way...

    Today I saw a female Monarch Butterfly in one of the flower gardens; it's an ecouraging sign the Monarch migration will be coming through here soon. That means we'll start checking the milkweed in the pasture for larva and reporting it to the "Monarch Larva Monitoring Project". We monitor in the spring (northern migration) and the fall (southern migration).

    OK, bees and butterflies, bugs! Maybe we're just weird, or, maybe we're just "stewards of nature" (I like that better). :) Anyway, since everyone here has a connection with insects, you might want to check out the University of Minnesota's Monarch site: http://www.mlmp.org/. They have training on Monarch larva monitoring and then request you report any findings. It's really quite intersting, and, if you have small children, it's probably easier to monitor since the children are closer to the milkweed. :thumbsup:

    Monarchs, similar to the bees, have had a hard time with climate and chemicals. If you can monitor monarch larva, I'm sure U od M will appreciate it.

    Walt
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    thanks for the link Walt. Jane will definitely be interested in that. She has been to the place in Mexico where the monarchs are headed... and one of her old students is now in charge of protecting the place. If the turmoil in Mexico ever abates I would like to venture their myself.
     

  3. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Tec, in another post you mentioned "Master Naturalists". That's how we got involved with the monitoring. We got 8 hours of training at Cibolo Nature Center and then recorded volunteer hours for the monitoring. We're no longer with the master naturalists, but we keep monitoring anyway.

    Might be something the Master Naturalist Chapter would want to look into. We each usually had a couple of hundred volunteer hours per year, but the 8 hours of training was always the most difficult requirement to complete.

    Walt
     
  4. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Thanks Walt for the website. I'll be checking that out.
    Here in Kansas, the University of Kansas has a program called Monarch Watch. www.monarchwatch.org
    Dr. Chip Taylor runs the program. He also has done extensive research on honey bees. They have an annual open house that is fascinating for those lucky enough to attend.
    I have given serious consideration to joining their program. I am very close to meeting all their criteria for an official Monarch Waystation.
     
  5. kiaRa

    kiaRa New Member

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    thanks for sharing the site Walt..

    i've been reading the article..

    and just wondering if the project is still ongoing??

    :goodpost:
     
  6. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    kiaRA,

    Yes, the project continues.

    We are finished monitoring until February, but we report rain amounts year round. Come February we will start looking for milkweed and monitoring for larva again.

    Walt