Fall is here

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by crazy8days, Sep 1, 2012.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Ok, its September and I'm getting concerned that I need to prep for winter. Two Saturdays from today my local bee club will be making sugar boards. I'm hoping to make it but work comes first. What should I be getting now to get my bees through the winter? Pest control? Feeding? Pollen patties? what?!! I'm starting to pull my hair trying to figure this out !
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    First - do a mite count! The rest won't matter much if they are going to crash anyway.
    Check for stores, do they or will they have enough to see them through winter in your area. If not, feed!
     

  3. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    As of a month ago I did not have any mites but, do have SHB in one hive. Using beetle jails but they hide under where you hang them. hive strong so no issues. Just hate them in there. Other two hives I will need to feed. Just doing poorly and wondering if SHB will be a bigger issue.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    We don't have SHB here (yet) :roll: so I can't offer much in the way of advice there.
     
  5. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    It's gonna be over 100 degrees almost every day next week so it's really hard to plan for cold weather. My main concern is keeping my neighbors bees from robbing out my one remaining yard hive!
     
  6. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Crazy...I put my reducers on today to help the bees keep the hornets and other rascals out. I am still hopeful I will get a little more honey out of some supers. If I don't see any by end of this week, off comes the mediums...I plan on making some candy board frames this month. Varroa count and treat also...
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    It may sound "insulting" to those who are convinced that they don't have varroa but, unless you have already given treatment to your hives against those miserable mites, take it for granted that you have them. Unless you've made a proper count that has convinced you that you're clean, be sure to treat for (=against) them. They can build up silently during the winter months and be a vital factor in the ability/inability of your hives to pass the winter in health. For the experienced, they are difficult to spot on bees. For the inexperienced, even more so. Don't wait till you have bees with crumpled or undeveloped wings being thrown out of the hive shock you into realizing that you've waited too long.:eek:
     
  8. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    I'm planning on making my bees mad as heck at me come Tuesday morning. I am going through to the bottom and check every thing out. I am planning on putting maq strips, I think they are called for Varroa any way. Should these be put on the bottom box or on all boxes. They have made some more honey and I am planning on taking the honey first than do the mite treatment. Also the bees are out on front of the hive even through the night, having lowes around 74 degrees and the humility is real high, could this be the case or the hive has to many bees in it. In the winter it will get sometimes down in the teens here and I don't want to leave to much space for them to try and heat, guess should wait until later to pull the top box off. What do you think. Oh I have one 8 frame deep and 2 medium suppers on now.

    kebee
     
  9. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I will use the powder sugar treatment. I have screen bottom boards. I can make a sticky board but should i place it under the board so the bees aren't walking all over it and should I place it under AFTER i sugar coat them. Thanks
     
  10. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Crazy...I used powdered sugar mid-summer after spraying vegetable spray on the board having it set in place. The bees naturally went for the sticky board with the sugar on it and in the end, I had lots of dead bees. I found out later I should be grinding table sugar to fine powder and using that instead. As I understand it, powdered sugar we buy at the store is mixed with corn syrup, corn starch and such and is not swell for the bees. I will put the sticky board on last this time...
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you do a count and have many mites, treat.

    If you don't do a count, don't treat with chemicals.

    You do more harm than good when you treat a hive with very few mites.

    It helps the mites build resistance to the chemical.

    If you don't treat a hive with just a few mites, you give the hive the opportunity to build resistance to the mites.

    That should be your eventual goal.
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Resistance, is a genetic trait and is something that can only "develop" (or more correctly, "be selected for") over generations of queens. Selecting those queens whose progeny show resistance and raising new queens from them will lead to resistant strains. Leaving the bees of a paricular queen to "learn" how to resist the mites won't help. It has to be in their genes and those come from the queen.
    For those bees that show no resistance, leaving them on their own won't teach them anything. The only way to help them is by treatments against the mites. The mites too become resistant only by selection over generations. Those mites that randomly (by a fluke of nature) have the ability to overcome the chemicals used against them, are "selected" for resistance. Those that live, pass on their resistance from one generation to the next and the populations that develop are genetically resistant. The same principle applies to bees-- the genes are passed on by the queens (and the drones) and not by the workers. The trouble is that for every generation of queens, there are "many tens" of generations of mites so their ability to develop resistant traits and be selected by poisons is much greater than that of the bees. The workers can be an indication of genetic resistance they received from the queen, but they cannot be trained to resistance.
     
  13. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    I've seen my neibor use powdered sugar to treat mites-he opened the hive and dumped it in on top of the frames-made them pretty upset, don't know if it actually encouraged grooming and dislodged mites. I've read about using drone comb and destroying it every few weeks-are either of these methods very affective?
     
  14. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Really? Every video and google came up with using good ol' powder sugar. Humm, more research!
     
  15. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Did some reading and found a few articles saying that corn starch MAY not be good for the bees. So, i YouTubed how to make powdered sugar. Simple and just made 8 cups. Now, I have the plane ol' screen bottom boards. How do I use a sticky board on those? Fasten it to the bottom side or slide it in on top of the screen.
     
  16. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    When you do the sugar treatment, use a flour sifter. You want to just lightly dust the frames.

    Put the sticky board under the screen bottom board. The idea is the mites fall through the screen and get stuck on the sticky and die, and can be counted, but the bees can't get on it so much.
    I use screened bottoms and under that a regular bottom, so my hives aren't exposed to the ground and there's a gap big enough to slide in a bit of cardboard under the screen. I would think if you have just the screened bottom and the sticky would be exposed under it, you may want to tape it up against the bottom or block off access to it or something like that or you'll have bees and ants and who knows what else.

    I used to use regular store bought powdered sugar and it never harmed the bees, but I did swap to an organic brand at a local natural grocer that doesn't have cornstarch. You can make your own, though? I shall have to do some googling.
     
  17. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Crazy8-

    As Iddee said, don't treat if you haven't done a mite count. In my experience, 1st year colonies rarely have mites at levels requiring treatment.
    If you have a slide-in board for your screened bottom board, spray it cooking oil (Pam), put it in for 24 hours, then remove and count mites. If you see over 50, you should treat.

    Store-bought powdered sugar is fine as long as temperatures are warm enough for them to be flying. The corn starch only becomes a problem if they are confined to the hive and can't void themselves.

    When I've treated with powdered sugar, I just use a flour sifter over the top of the hive (no supers on). 1 cup per brood box. Treat at least 3 consecutive weeks.
     
  18. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Well, I put in a sticky board I made and added veggie oil. The weakest hive I have had nearly a hundred mites. So, I dusted with powder sugar that I made. Second hive had less than 50. The swarm I caught this spring and the one I was able to get honey from I did not check due to still having a super on it. My weakest hive has still not filled out it's second deep. About only 6 frames.