Fall Nuc & Queen

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by rail, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. rail

    rail New Member

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    Is it to late to start a 5 frame nuc and raise a new queen?

    I have a 10 frame double deep that is exploding with population and a new hive with a new queen that is laying great. Thought about pulling a frame of eggs and brood from the new hive and pulling the other frames needed from the over populated hive.

    I am willing to do what it takes for this 5 frame nuc to survive the winter!
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Probably too late for trying to raise a queen and survive, too big an interruption in the brood. You might squeak by if you buy another queen and give it all the help you can.
    Risky.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You are risking 2 good hives to try and get a nuc that you will feed more sugar than a nuc would cost in Apr.

    Keep them strong over winter and make 2 nucs from each in Mar. or April, if you want that many.
     
  4. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Iddee, I was reading up on splits and read where they are best done after the first good flow. That would be around March and April like you said right? Of course, it will matter what region...
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Here, it would be before the flow. Splitting after the flow means honey AND splits, but feed the splits.

    Splitting before the flow means "possibly" no honey, but splits feed themselves.

    Preference depends on what your goal is.
     
  6. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Very good...thanks...
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    It always seems that hives have great populations in them at this time of year and it would be easy to make nucs because of all the excess bees. But most of those bees are getting old and nearing the end of their life's. Brood emerging now are the bees that will being the hive thru the winter. The queen and bees have cut back brood rearing to the rate of 20,000 to 30,000 sustained hive numbers for winter, down from the 60,000 for the honey flow season.
    As Iddee said do all you can to successfully overwinter the hives you have and split in the spring when the hive wants to be increasing in size.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think this was the question posted....

    'Is it to late to start a 5 frame nuc and raise a new queen?'

    I not being from your neck of the woods would have no way of knowing yes or no. As far as the other post on this 'not yet answered question' I would somewhat to highly disagree and I think perhaps if you consulted with someone like Michael Palmer he might disagree also (which is where I originally got the idea to do just about exactly what rail seem to be suggesting). of course appropriate timing is a good part of this and as I said above I have no way of knowing the answer to this question.

    To take the question one step further I would guess it is not too late in much of the southern US to buy a queen and make a split and nurture it thru the winter.
     
  9. Minz

    Minz Member

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    Don't forget you need drones in the equation. If you can get her mated you can rob the big hive for brood combs for a while but she has to start laying.