Feeding Granulated honey?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Barry Tolson, Oct 15, 2011.

  1. Barry Tolson

    Barry Tolson New Member

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    If I recall correctly, I once read that if a super of honey were placed over an inner cover, then the bee's would get up in that super and would transfer the honey down below the inner cover. I've never tried this, so would like to know if anyone has done this, and if so...how it worked.
    If this "does", in fact work, is there any point to providing the bee's with a comb of honey that has mostly granulated? My reason for approaching this is to see if I can take a few combs of mostly granulated honey...get some use from the honey "and" save the combs. I don't really want to cut them out and melt them down if I can help it. Thanks!
     
  2. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    I have put frames above the IC to have the bees clean them out. It has worked well for me, but it seems to help to scratch the cappings to entice them to move things. Of course I would take proper precautions to discourage robbing.

    That being said, I think the above advice is good, especially if you're going to be replacing otherwise empty frames in the hive. I believe I read that bees use moisture to reliquify granulated honey, so the crystalized stuff may not actually be so readily available to them.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    you know I can not recall ever finding a dead out with granulated honey still present, so I assume they do reutilize the stuff. I myself would place any granulated honey inside the box and not above anything. it is my understanding also that some water is necessary for reusing granulated honey but their is some small quantity of water produced by the respiration of the bees which invariable end up at the top of the stack and generally on the bottom of the top (inner cover in some folks case).