Feeding in Plastic Bags

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by dr.buzz, May 28, 2012.

  1. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    I have a weak nuc that I thought could use some protein. I mixed honey and water and soy flour until it was able to be made into a patty and laid on the top bars of the frames. Someone said I should put it in a plastic Ziploc-type bag to keep it from drying out. I wonder if I should poke holes in it like the folks that feed 1:1 syrup in bags or what....
    Has anyone done this?
     
  2. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    Since it is solid enough to be a patty, I would put in a couple of small slits.
    Fork holes on a solid, I don' think the plastic would conform to the shape continually.

    I know that isn't clear, so I'll go to the back of the bus again !

    Murrell
     

  3. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    Unless your summer dry spell is already on you and are in a dearth, I wouldn't think your bees would take pollen substitute at this time of year.

    Wouldn't it be easier to boost their numbers and stores by switching out a few frames with one of your stronger hives?
     
  4. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    No rain in quite a while, temps already hitting mid-to-high 90s, lots of bearding throughout the day and bee traffic has slowed down, I'm thinking we are getting dearthy early.

    I don't normally ever feed pollen sub type stuff, but I wanted to see what this hive would do with it. Normally I'd just give them some capped brood or combine them with someone else in the worst case scenario, but this hive has some issues that I'm looking at. It might be more than just low numbers, and if they have something more serious wrong with them I don't want to waste brood on them. I don't know why their numbers started falling, but if it's just a simple case of malnutrition, I want to see if just a little help can turn things around. If I recall, I started them off pretty weak, like a mated queen and two frames of stuff, and ignored them, besides giving them another couple frames of drawn comb. With the flow going, I let them fend for themselves.

    Now, the other day I popped the lid and saw over a dozen bees carrying larvae around. On one of the frames the larvae was dried up and could almost just fall out of the cells if I held the frame horizontally. White, dried up bees and larvae on the ground in front of the hive. They were very light on stores. So I started them on syrup and mixed up this soy flour stuff. Might just be chalkbrood/malnutrition because they didn't have enough foragers during the flow? I don't know. And some of the capped brood looked flat. Not discolored and sunken or anything, just flat.

    I'm thinking it is just bad beekeeping on my part and some feeding will help them out.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    sometimes I have fed fairly soupy pollen substitute in one of those small round plastic 'lids' that is used to reseal a lot of products now days. some space is required between top bars and lid for them to access the content. as far as the stuff you mixed up.... I have found if you mix enough sugar with it they will take it up no matter what.