Feeding Regime ??

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Zulu, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    My three weaker hives - all with 10 frame Deep plus one medium _ are all taking feed...... using hive top feeders .

    I add a quart at a time (1:1 mix with dash of Honey B Healthy) and they gobble it in about 36-48 hours (Strongest of the three is almost done in 24 hrs) . But I cannot give them this every second day.......

    The question _ how often should I be feeding them??

    NOTE: I am still seeing Pollen coming in albeit in small amounts.
    I do need to go in and check the stores, but been too hot (for me) when I had the time , maybe later today after work.
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    purely guessing I would say about ever 7 to 10 days. although the feed is moved in 2 days or so it is not necessarily consumed in this time slot.
     

  3. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Thanks Tec.

    I assumed that but wanted to be sure.

    Just boiled up 14 gallons of 1:1 mix with Honey be Healthy added. Helps being a home brewer and having kegs to keep it in. Easy to pump into feeders with CO2.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would not venture a guess to how much until you have checked empty space. If they don't have ample expansion room, the feed should stop or a box added.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Iddee bring up an important point...

    most time hefting will tell you the limitation that Iddee is speaking too... you can of course look inside and that is perfectly acceptable also. doing both will give you some feel of the relationship between hefting weight and internal condition. if a bee hive was 'feather light' you would want to fill the feeder a bit more often and if every cell has nectar then you likely need to curtail feeding somewhat. over feeding can (I think without a doubt) lead to its own set of problem.

    ps zulu my syrup cooking vat is an old stainless steel bee keg with the top cut out and a pipe and valve added to the bottom for draining. I typically cook up about 10 gallons at a time although shortly I will need to expand this capacity somewhat.
     
  6. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    As most everyone knows, there has been a sustained drought in most of Texas. In my area of the northeast corner I have not seen rain in many days. It rained a little north of here yesterday and completely missed my area. I have not seen alot of pollen and nectar sources due to lack of water. Would any of you think that the bees need to be fed periodically, and how often would that be? Will they consume their stores from what they brought in in the spring without a source to bring in from during this drought? Today I watched them come and go and did not see any pollen being brought back. :dontknow:
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Everything here has or is quickly going thru their reserves. The spring time here was so dry that only a small number made any surplus which I was afraid to remove since even those are liable to come up short before the next set of flowers arrive.

    As Iddee suggested above having some information on what is inside is critical prior to forming some feeding plan. Truthfully I typically look a bit inside before I even add a feeder and after that I heft one end to test for weight. As a rule the small stuff (nucs and such) get a quart about every week and the larger stuff get a frame feeder on about a 10 day to 2 week schedule.

    this year I will accumulate a huge feed bill but I would rather ration it out over an extended time period than to feed large quantities in a frenzy all at once.