Feeding when it is Hot and Dry?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by jangrinnell, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. jangrinnell

    jangrinnell New Member

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    I live in NW Arkansas. It is hot and dry. My hives are doing great. But I really haven't noticed my girls out and about visiting my plants nor have my neighbors commented. Should I be feeding these guys?
     
  2. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    I'm in southern Missouri, I'm feeding two, month old splits but the others appear to be ok, at present.

    Murrell
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You feed when the hives have very little stores. Don't feed if there is 50 lbs. of honey in the hive.
     
  4. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Your bees are doing what they need to survive. They are strong because they have the resources they need and they are not wasting what they have. Feeding could stimulate brood production that will actually starve your hive or lead to Winter failure. We do the same with grass. We feed to stimulate and actually set it off the natural course to ultimate destruction. The bees and grass look good right now and die when the season changes.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    feeding can be done for a number of reasons. I will list a few items and hopefully some other posters will add to the list..

    1) feed to prevent starvation or adding weight (generally prior to overwintering a hive).
    2) feed to stimulate brood production for
    a) and upcoming honey flow
    b) to produce a quantity of young bees going into winter time 'hybernation'.
    3) to stimulate the pulling or making of wax

    if you are feeding for reason #1 then some idea of how much stores a hive currently has is essential information.

    if you are feeding for reason #2 then timing and duration of feeding is the critical consideration.

    if you are feeding for reason #3.... generally done during the warmer months this program generally requires you to keep a constant source of feed on the bees to see any real results.

    and my final advice would be this.... in almost all feeding regimes think dribble and not pour. that is... a very small constant flow of syrup will accomplish more than drowning the bees in a one time flood of sugar water.