Few pictures of bees on my corn, wow

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I walked by the corn and the bees were in there like crazy and their beck legs were just full of yellow pollen. Had to have been thousands. Pictures a little blurry because of camera phone. Most corm stalks had 3-7 bees on each one. I didn't think there was anything in corn for bees.

    The last picture has 7 bees on one stalk. :thumbsup:

    2012-06-10_09-18-35_269.jpg 2012-06-10_09-17-08_675.jpg 2012-06-10_09-18-35_269.jpg 2012-06-10_09-17-42_102.jpg
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Nice pics. I did't think so either but then I saw how much worry there was over the crops and ccd.
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Should help toward a nice crop of honey! :coolphotos:
     
  4. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    My corn is just starting to tassle. I'll have to keep an eye on it.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    they collect pollen from corn usually when nothing else is available. They collect no nectar from corn that I am aware of. Corn being wind pollenated is less in nutrients than insect pollenated pollen. A lot of people that collect pollen will shut down they're traps while corn is tassled out and producing pollen.
     
  6. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Thanks riverrat. interesting to know about the corn pollen. I was kinda suprised to see them in the corn like that as I knew it was wind pollenated.

    I have a 110 acre field right next to me that is covered in white and yellow flowers. I have no idea if the flowers are something beneficial to bees though. I hope it is. They are not hardly taking much sugar water though, so I assume they are getting the real stuff right now from somewhere.
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    another thing I might add. Neonicotinoid are widely used in the corn industry. There has been a lot of discussion as to if the dew in the morning has any of the pesticide residue and is what is contributing to the loss of bees. You cant keep them off of the corn and to my knowlege I have not seen confirmed concrete evidence proving the
    neonicotinoids are to blame.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    riverrat, good discussion and nice pictures, you said:
    "they collect pollen from corn usually when nothing else is available. They collect no nectar from corn that I am aware of." and "another thing I might add. Neonicotinoid are widely used in the corn industry. There has been a lot of discussion as to if the dew in the morning has any of the pesticide residue and is what is contributing to the loss of bees. You cant keep them off of the corn and to my knowlege I have not seen confirmed concrete evidence proving the neonicotinoids are to blame."

    rat, my bees collect pollen from the corn, later in the season than yours, there is no nectar, just the pollen. and as you said when nothing else is available. i would like to also say, my bees are kept in farm country, tucked between fields of corn and soybeans for over 10 years, and have been concerned about the neo's affecting my bees. to date, i have yet to see a colony collapse in my own apiary from their gathering of the pollen from the fields, or concrete evidence proving this. i guess i have been more concerned about the affects of what we don't see, long term, stored in the combs of our hives from the bees collecting pollen from the gmo crops......i do cycle frames, but don't know if this is enough.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    another thing I might add. Neonicotinoid are widely used in the corn industry. There has been a lot of discussion as to if the dew in the morning has any of the pesticide residue and is what is contributing to the loss of bees.

    tecumseh:
    it seems Randy Oliver has a reliable reference (May 2012 ABJ) to the effect of bees located near corn in a small study by Eric Erickson. No date for the test was specified but the likely culprit in this study was permethrin applied to the bloom (tassels). I think this study predates the use of neonicotinoids. A few paragraphs later he provides a description of what sounds a lot like ccd that dates back to 1897.
     
  10. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I went completely with Heirloom, organic, untreated, unltered seeds this year for everything in the garden. Not a Hybrid plant in my garden. Corn included. I want to be able to save all my own seed year after year. Spent a boat load of money on the initial lot of seeds this year, but I should not have to buy anything after this year. I just did not like all the Hybrid, treated, corporate, altered stuff. Since 2008, I've been working on changing the way I live. Now I am really glad I have done this. Feels good knowing all those bees are getting healthy food for their hives.
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I've planted sweet corn (some, 10 ft. from my hives) for over 35 yrs. and have never had a problem with the bees, like Yankee, my bees are all over it for pollen every year.Had a problem today though, the 9 tenths rain was welcome, but the 65 mile an hour wind layed the middle of a acre sweet corn down (it is about 10 days from making). The odd thing was, the outside stalks on the windward side was standing straight? Jack