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We have a couple of filbert (hazelnut) trees that are the same age ( about 10-12 feet high ). One is doing really well but the other is doing poorly. We noticed this last year but didn't really get around to checking out what was wrong. Well this year it is looking even worse so yesterday I gave it the once over. I noticed in the clump of trunks coming up out of the ground that ants have built a nest about a foot high! :shock:'
This just has to be the problem. This tree is in such hard shape and crowded, that I would like to remove it. It would give the other filbert and a high bush blueberry much more room.
My question is, do filberts need to have another tree nearby for pollination purposes (cross) or would having just one be OK?
Thanks.
 

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Hi Perry! I would say if you want nut production you would. Otherwise, it will grow just fine by lonesome....
 

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I've been doing a LOT of research on pollination for my husband's seed library project so I have a number of sites bookmarked...and according to what I've just read Corylus maxima is a monoecious plant that's wind pollinated.
So there you go, it has male and female flowers on a single plant and shouldn't need another nearby.
 

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How very odd! I did more reading, and apparently they do require sister trees for cross pollination, and apparently different cultivars crossing is best. Now I'm just confused, but I have been researching more about saving to breed true than producing fruits on things! LOL
 

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Many monoecious trees, while capable of self pollination, give much better results if cross pollinated by different varieties of the same species. Two examples of this trait are apples and pears (and now we have learned that about hazelnuts too) which is why apple and pear orchards are planted in mixed varieties. It seems that they have a gene that suppresses self pollination, which encourages variety, a necessary element of successful species survival and evolution.
Needless to say, this is why bees are so important for agriculture, particularly in those plants that are not wind pollinated.
 

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You can also prune the plant to generate new growth, clean up the ant issue, and then prune out about 30% of all older growth.

The tree will put out new suckers from root stock, Next year cut out another 30%. Then prune from then on how you want the tree to grow.

These are the prime plant medium for USA grown truffles. From right here in NC, largest area outside Europe for Black truffles.
 

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Hey Perry, are there different types of Hazelnuts? the Hazelnuts around here grow on a bush? (never seen them 10 to 12 ft. high?) I have Hazelnut bushes growing next to some of my hives and when they bloom the bees work them. They use to grow wild in my area, but where we use to gather feed sacks full of them in the fall is all houses now. Not found any in the woods for years, oldtimers say the ground squirrels get them? Jack
 

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All I can add is that we have a monster hazlenut (20+ ft) tree near our house (roasted honey-coated hazels in the fall, anyone?) and no others for at least half a mile. It produces plenty (to me, at least)
 
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