Final prep

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by brooksbeefarm, Mar 21, 2010.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Sam,Welcome to beekeeping, There is nothing cheap anymore in bee supplies that i know of, even if you make your own it can be costly. As for the best hive that will produce the most honey , allow you to make queens, and live through the winter? Well, i've had bees since 1965 and i'm still trying to figure that out :confused: . I'm not trying to discourage you, but it sounds like your asking to much to soon. Sometimes when buying cheap you get what you pay for, so if you know a local beekeeper or a bee club, find a mentor to help you. Once you get started,there's a good chance you'll be hooked forever :mrgreen: . Good Luck. Jack
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    the kit thingee has always sounded to me like spending money on stuff you don't need.

    shipping is a good portion of the $ equation in the equipment, so often time the closer the source the cheaper the end product.

    if you plan to have more than one hive consider that you will eventually need 4 to 5 boxes per hive X 10 frames per box. all the suppliers I know sell boxs by the 10's and frames by the 100's cheaper than smaller quantities.

    if you are just starting first focus you $ on an acceptable protection (I think the pollinator's jackets would be a good choice for a lot of beginners), a good hive tool and a better than average smoker.
     

  3. rast

    rast New Member

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    One tip Sam, buy commercial grade. The quality is fine.
    As far as protective gear, you need to be comfortable working around them. If you are apprehensive about getting stung while in your hives you won't enjoy them or learn near as much. There's nothing macho about not wearing a bee suit.
    My last bunch of Hive body's came from Brushy. That was due to free freight. Quality was real good.
    The hives and supers don't have much to do with making honey. That has to do with the number, genetics, and condition of the bees in the boxes. Just as important is the strength and duration of the flow. They have to use part of the flow to build comb in those frames. The first of that is going to be used for brood comb, then some storage for themselves, around the brood and in the brood chamber. Then if they are going to be a strong hive, they move up in the second box and repeat the process. Then that super, they build it out and fill it with honey for them so they can get through hard times. Then they repeat the process in that next super, that's a lot of wax building. If they get that far this spring and that mentor Brooks had you find says you will normally get a strong summer/fall flow, that top super could be yours. If you preserve that drawn honey comb until the next flow, you will see why it's worth its weight in liquid gold.
     
  4. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Sam,

    Involvement with a local club can have many benefits. The local guys will be able to direct you to local suppliers of bees & equipment that you may not be aware of. For example, there's a Mann Lake dealer downstate from you. A tank of gas may be less than shipping costs!
    http://www.mannlakeltd.com/infopage.asp?idPage=64

    Check into local clubs:
    http://njbeekeepers.org/LocalBranches.htm

    http://www.pastatebeekeepers.org/Report ... ctors.htm#
     
  5. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Join a club. I bought a nuc for my first bees. That fellow lived at least two hours away so there was no way he could tell me what the bees were doing. I also didn't know of a local club at that time.
    that first nuc didn't live thru the first winter. During the winter a NEW bee club started localy so I joined.
    I found a couple of packages of bees right after I found my dead out which took two days callingh on the phone.
    On the first inspection I had a older bee keeper from the club come and look at them with me. colony # 1 appeard ok but #2 was sick with some thing. More club members were called to look at them to see if they knew what was wrong with them. All said to kill them one offered a swarm. I killed them and colony #1 a week latter as they had gotten sick too. More club members steped in and I had 5 double deep colonies when fall arrived thanks to club members. I would not be a bee keeper today if I would have had to buy a third start. Bees are about twice the cost today as back then.
    Moral of the story is join a club, they might just save your bacon

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  6. bdrowe

    bdrowe New Member

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    Hi Sam, welcome to beekeeping

    I have a suggested list of equipment on my website as you found. I'm not really an equipment store. I try to help local beekeepers get set up. I'll be taking a trip out to Brushy Mt. for a group order and I can probably save you a lot if you have me pick up your order. Send me an email if you're interested.

    Our next meeting for the Morris & Somerset Beekeepers is April 17th in Bedminster, about 30 min from you.
    Bob Hughes will be walking through a hive opening. It's listed on the calendar on my website.

    Regards,
    Brian
    Douglas Farm - http://www.douglasfarm.net
    908-443-1199
    bdrowe81@gmail.com