FINALLY, eggs.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by heinleinfan, May 16, 2012.

  1. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    ...not that I had none in a hive and finally do, but that today was the first time in nearly 5 years of keeping that I finally managed to see eggs. And once I did, well then of course I just kept seeing them all over the place!

    I went into my two hives today to check on progress. Alpha was my split, and I wanted to see if their new queen was laying. Beta was my superproductive hive from which I had 2 splits and a swarm, I wanted to see if they had a post-swarm queen.

    I saw the eggs first in Alpha. They have good population, great brood pattern, and tons of capped brood, larva and eggs waiting to come out. I spotted the queen and she's a dandy, but was totally camera shy. I saw a few drones hanging around the place, but no drone comb or brood and not a sign of varroa.


    In Beta I spotted the queen (for sure this time, heh) and SHE'S A MONSTER! I mean seriously, she's huge. And again, there were eggs all over, and I could spot them clear as day. I did see a few varroa, so I'm going to sugar dust in the next couple of weeks. The hive population is still quite high, but I didn't see any sign of more swarm queen cells, and I checked every frame.


    I'm still concerned about drone population in Beta. I have had bad luck getting bees to move into a super past an excluder in the past, so Beta doesn't have one, but I went ahead and put it on today. They ladies have have apparently deemed the honey super "Drone World" and there is a lot of brood in with the honey, and it's about 90% drone. (I'm not overly concerned that my queen is too set on drone laying. In the deeps there was excellent brood pattern, and plenty of eggs in regular sized cells. It's only the super that's packed full of drone now.)

    So, a question about freezing out drone brood, because I've never had drone population like this to deal with before.

    I'm thinking at this point my best option would be to take out those shallow frames that are all drone to freeze them. But, most of the frames that do have drone brood also have honey. Can I cut out the brood and just freeze that, and put the frames back in with the honey and large gaps? Think the ladies will keep on making honey cells or just revert back to building out drone cells again? Or do I need to just cut the brood out and go ahead and harvest that honey, and put all fresh foundations in?

    Thanks everyone!
     
  2. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Congrats! It's cool isn't it?
    Much easier on black foundation vs white.
    If I'm unsure I take out the digital camera and load the pics on the computer and blow them up.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Freeze the whole frames and put them back above the excluder. The bees will clean out the drones and fill the cells with honey. It doesn't hurt to freeze honey. it will be fine.
     
  4. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    Oooohhhh, I didn't realize that I didn't need to clean out the dead brood once frames had been frozen. They'll do that?
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yes they will......:grin:
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    heinleinfan writes:
    They'll do that?

    tecumseh:
    us humans (and sometime even some aliens :mrgreen:) give task identifications to certain age classes of the worker population. in this case this group of workers bees are call undertaker bees.

    live drones can not go thru an excluder either. so if you do have live drone population above an excluder an upper entrance is a good idea.