Finally, now a registered beekeeper!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by RE Jones, Jul 27, 2012.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I have been waiting since December of last year to get my hives inspected. The inspector for my area retired in February of this year and the new inspector has been playing "catch up".

    She came out yesterday and inspected my four hives. Very knowledgeable lady and was very helpful. She told me several things that I was doing right and made suggestions on several things that needed improvement. All in all, I learned a little bit and was glad to know that I have been doing most of it right.

    The hives passed with flying colors and according to her they looked great. The swarm that I hived about two weeks ago, is probably out performing the other two langs as far as comb production and egg laying. Out of the four frames that they have drawn out, three of them are full of brood. Once they start hatching, I will have to keep and eye on this one before they go in to swarm mode.

    All of them have plenty of stores and they are still bringing in pollen and nectar, from where I do not know.

    The TBH had some more cross comb and we removed a piece that was loaded with some of the best honey I have ever tasted. I just wish I knew what it was from as she even made a comment that it was some of the best she had ever tasted.

    Any one who is hesitant about being inspected should not be. If their inspector is anything like mine, you will learn something and feel 100% better after she has inspected and found everything is good.
    Robert
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I though the law in Fla was that you had to re-queen any caught swarms.

    Glad to hear things are going in your favor with the bees :thumbsup:
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    They wanted to make a good impression on the inspector and provided you with a registration gift. I hope that you keep getting repeat performances. :grin:
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Glad you got your official status! Congratulations.

    Thank you for the reminder. This inspection is going to be miserably hot, but I haven't gotten registered yet. Started out with nothing to inspect this year. 5 hives, it's time.
     
  5. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I sent in my registration in March and have yet to hear from the Tennessee state inspector. However, they say he is a one-man-show and is way behind. So I figure I'm ok.

    I'm glad your inspection went well. Keep it up! :thumbsup:
     
  6. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    G3, not a law, but a suggestion. They can not make you re-queen, but they would like for you to.

    That was one thing that we talked about during the inspection. All of my hives have superseded this year. I had two bought queens in hives that only lasted for two months, they were superseded. She said that this was common this year.

    And NO, none of my hives have AHB. This is kinda funny as all of the bees south of I4 are "considered" to be. All of my hives have come from cut outs or swarms.
    Like she said, the more European honeybee hives there are, the less of the AHB we should see. They do not like competition and will move on.
    Robert
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    "the more European honeybee hives there are, the less of the AHB we should see. They do not like competition and will move on."

    Now THAT is a valuable piece of information to have!

    Gypsi
     
  8. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Anybody know the origin of this comment? I suspect this amounts to marketing on the "pro" side of honey bees to some extent.

    AHB are great at out reproducing EHB by a yearly swarm rate of 18 to 2. AHB use tactics like usurpation to take over EHB colonies.

    And their genetics overwhelm that of EHBs.

    I have never seen it stated that simply placing more EHB hives into an area, will push out AHB colonies. And for the colony density that has been reported in the past, I would not think that they would be bothered by managed EHB colonies.

    Is this a new statement? Have you heard this before? And what is the basis for these comments?

    Thank you.
     
  9. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    A few years back I heard Jerry Hayes speak on how Florida was dealing with AHB, and he specifically said that they considered healthy populations of EHB as their first line of defense. Note the first point of the Florida Best Management Practices:
    http://www.freshfromflorida.com/pi/plantinsp/apiary/bmp_hbq.doc

    Even in their educational materials for children, this point is made:
    "Honey bee hives managed by beekeepers can even discourage the establishment of Africanized honey bees in an area, because when an Africanized honey bee comes along and sees an area is already occupied by other bees, it will often just move on to another location."
    http://www.freshfromflorida.com/pi/plantinsp/apiary/images/Bissy%20Bee%20Lesson%20Plan_web.pdf (page 44)

    As for the basis of the comments - good question.
     
  10. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I am sure that the comments made by Jerry Hayes is where this came from. After all, he used to be her boss.

    I would like to know where the 18 to 2 number on swarms came from. This was also something that she mentioned. Is this a fact of an assumption that someone made?

    I would also like to know why the state would allow someone to actually have an apiary that is nothing but AHB. We do have one in the state that I know of. Looks like to me that this would be conuter productive.
    Robert
     
  11. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Lisa is from Alabama. Maintaining an abundance of European bees increases the chance of the queen mating with EHB drones. AHB only usurp hives 20 percent of the time. The spread of AHB is from the competitive advantage of AHB drones. AHB drones fly faster and are in greater numbers. The queen has a mechanism that selects AHB semen 90 percent of the time. Some of the early AHB EHB compparisons and predictions have come to be exaggerations. http://americasbeekeeper.org/Africanized_Honey_Bee.htm
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Gary,

    I think I just killed an ahb queen, but I didn't keep her body (it was attracting a lot of attention and I was already being stung or attempted stung through my suit). I went to your website (and very nice it is). The queen had red legs - like red ant colored... African? I did not see many drones, but it was around noon, they might have been out in a DCA. They are going to have to make their own queen - any way I can make it easier for that queen to mate with one of my good hives?
     
  13. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    AHB workers, drones, and queens look like EHB. You can only tell measuring with a microscope and averaging ten bee morphometrics (FABIS, USDA-ID). Every queen attracts workers.
    The only way to increase EHB mating is to saturate the area with several hives with ample drones. They need to be placed some distance away from the target queen.