Finding, raising, queens. I just became a newbie again.

Discussion in 'Raising Queens' started by Gypsi, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    OK, I killed the queen of the hot hive. It is so hot I certainly wouldn't introduce a nice queen today in a cage or not. And not just temperature hot, these ladies are down right rowdy. And have been since spring. Too hot to work, don't respond to smoke even, just kept right on trying to sting me, attacking suit and veil. Took 2 stings through the suit, so close together I thought just one initially. Her brood pattern was excellent, she was laying well, tons of bees, not much honey - but I had a queen excluder on their super too. There was certainly some fresh uncapped and capped honey. Not a huge amount, very messy comb. I didn't rob them, been feeding.

    Also my cutout queen really isn't doing much of a job of laying, but then again, it is very hot outside, and it may not be her fault.

    I have 2 full hives, one deep, 2 mediums (top medium recently added on each) of vsh bees, and one nuc with a June-purchased vsh queen who is laying well.

    My initial plan after killing the hot queen (and I didn't keep her body, kiss that queen pheromone goodbye), was to let them be queenless for 3 or 4 days, then swap brood with one of the vsh hives, probably the one in my yard, cutting out queen cups on the way across the yard. So that the queen they raise has good genetics.

    My beeclub just ordered in queens, but I didn't get on the order because I didn't know I would need a queen for sure until I caught her this morning.

    I have time but not much money, temps in the 100's. Any way I can turn this into a nice educational queen rearing education on the cheap? I am hesitant to combine this hot hive with one of my healthy ones, they are very hot now. Granted they were nice in the 2nd week of june when I went queen hunting, dearth and open honey may be contributing.
    Right now I have 5 hives, and I'd like to stay there.

    Awaiting your wisdom
    Gypsi
     
  2. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    I have the same thing on one hive ,but they make honey in bricks.My plan is to cage the queen for five days then break them into nucs and put nicer queen cells in the nucs.
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Well I kind of jumped the gun on caging the queen. She sure was prolific
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    of course a lot of hives nastiness is related to their population. reduce the population and quite often time their defensive nature is also reduced. robber guards also tend to help (greatly I should add) with this problem.

    I myself will only tolerate a very defensive hive for a short period of time. three strikes (that is the number of times I notice they are unpredictable nasty) and they are evicted from the game.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I feel sad - I killed a cordovan queen yesterday and didn't even know it. but I had to move this hive from the front garden to the back of the lot due to more than 3 strikes, and if I hadn't had a veil on Saturday I would have had a face full of stings. Smoke doesn't even slow them down. I suspect this beautiful queen mated with a very hot male. Her nature wasn't that bad, but her offspring are too hot to handle. The lot is off limits for a few days, except the very front of it by the pond. This is why I put up privacy fence when I got my first bees too.
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have an idea. I need a queen for the cutout hive too, theirs is failing I think, or the dearth is getting to her. I had a temporary aha moment, maybe I could merge the 2, they do have a mature laying queen with reasonably good genetics and their temperament is lovely. But if she gets killed I'm down a queen.

    I have a nuc with a vsh queen I bought for this hive who is quite productive and I've just added a 2nd nuc on top. Great laying pattern last time I checked, great temperament.

    It would be educational if I merged the hives but I could lose both of them.

    Or I can cut out their queen cups, give them a frame of eggs from my vsh hive (not as sweet as the cutout but quite productive and fairly tolerant - the one at my neighbors is the sweeter bunch.) And watch and at what point can I swipe a maturing queen or 2 and move them into nucs for queen rearing, just leaving the hot bees one or two queen cups?

    hmmmm