First honey

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Buzzen, Aug 28, 2011.

  1. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I didn't think the bees would do so good since this is the first year. Turns out they have 3 supers of honey on each hive. I took only 3 frames so far, we are going into a dearth soon and I'm not sure how much to leave them. I would rather they have enough to make the winter.

    [attachment=0:2o0p2gse]bees 109.jpg[/attachment:2o0p2gse]
     

    Attached Files:

  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I see a jar of honey that I bet your going to tell me is the best honey in the world. Im not going to agree with you because your first jar is always the best no matter who you are.
     

  3. jim314

    jim314 New Member

    Messages:
    586
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Cool, still waiting on my first jar. It will be next year because of this drought. But I still remember the first egg we had from our chickens. It was so exciting. Then the coyotes killed all the chickens, hope the bees fair better than the chickens did :)
    Jim
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks for sharing the picture. the first honey is always the best there is no disputing that. it is good that you got to take a taste in year one. you deserve it, you studied and worked hard for this little reward.

    what do reckon the source of honey in the bottle is?
     
  5. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I'm guessing alfalfa, but not totally sure.
     
  6. milapostol

    milapostol New Member

    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Congrats on your first jar. It's always a good feeling!
     
  7. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nice! I'm still holding out hope. All the be boxes are full of drawn comb, brood and honey and there are 2 hives with medium honey supers on them with drawn comb and some clear liquid in the cells. The goldenrod is just starting to bloom everywhere I look.

    A $1500.00 jar of honey! lol
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    From what I've read, alfalfa honey is considered top of the line. Enjoy it. :D
    The picture seems to show a honey that is partially granulated. Did you keep it in the fridge for a while? If you're lucky enough to get it to crystalize rapidly into small crystals, you'll get creamed honey. That's the greatest!! :yahoo:
     
  9. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Congratulations!! You'll be glad you took a picture, trust me...I am.
     
  10. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    hmmmm. . . how do you make creamed honey without equipment? heat, quench cycles?
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    me2pl writes:
    how do you make creamed honey without equipment?

    tecumseh:
    generally you start with a honey that granulates easily (sunflower, rape seed or canola) then you chill the honey slightly and then use a drill/mixer and ss paint stirring blade and whip vigorously. optimally you want the stirring blade to be sharp to cut the granulating honey crystals.

    or simply place most honey in the frig (not the freezer) and the same kind of process occurs. the end product is not as smooth as creamed honey.
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I often have crystalized honey in my frames for stores that werenot used over the winter. When I extract this honey, I crush the crystals over my filter fabric. Only the finest crystals go through the filter and mix with the honey in the barrel. If this honey is mixed and placed in the fridge for a few weeks, it quickly crystalizes into small crystals and gives a nice creamy texture that stays with the honey after it is taken out of the fridge.
    The standard way is to use "seed honey", al;ready crystalized honey that you thoroughly mix with the honey you want to cream. For this there are all sorts of techniques--ranging from the active, like Tec recommends, to the lazy man's --mine, and let it crystalize into small-crystalled honey. The trick is to get small crystals, and that happens when you get it to crystalize fast, like in a fridge. If you have a cold basement, that probably would do the job too.
    It's really worth the small effort. The honey doesn't separate into different layers of big crystals and is easy to manage when spreading.
    All my family loves, and prefers it this way.
     
  13. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    making creamed honey is the process tec explained earlier I would like to add the optimal temp for making creamed honey is 54 degrees
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36

    River, :hi:
    Please remember, there's more than one way to skin a cat. Some ways are easier than others. I learned my way by sheer luck of chance. If it interests you, you are welcome to give it a try, I didn't take out a patent. :yahoo:
     
  15. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    post it up im game for anything
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    River, I'm in the US now, visiting with my ailing 99 year old mother. It's a bit difficult for me to make a full post on the topic. Maybe, when I back home and things return to normal, I'll be able to sit down and "blog" it.