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Just came in from checking my hive and I have a question. The bees have drawn out all but two frames in two deep supers. They have full frames of uncapped honey towards the outside of the upper deep. I saw my queen in the lower box laying, however I did find a queen cell with nothing in it in the upper box. Last week when I saw the queen she looked a lot smaller but maybe I was just excited to see her after looking for her for so long. They have a TON of capped brood, larva, eggs, tons of stores everywhere I look. To me it looks real good for a combined hive so I added a honey super to give them more room. Does it sound to you expirienced keeps like it was the time for a super? We have an awesome flow going right now and I did notice some backfilling in the brood areas so I am guessing that they need more room already? If only my hive looked like the pictures I have seen :lol: Boy, when a colony really gets big, there sure is a lot to look at and wonder :D
 

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A good flow means that your bees have a rich source of nectar-producing flowers for collecting. Those are the best times to get your bees to build new combs. They need a lot of cells for holding the nectar that comes in while they evaporate the water and concentrate it into honey.
Pray for good weather so it lasts a long time. :beg:
 

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you can somewhat estimate the scope of 'a good flow' by dong the splash test when you do an inspection.

the splash test is accomplished by going to the top most 'honey' in the hive and choosing a frame that remains uncapped. you pick up one frame by it 'ears' and holding it horizontally flick your wrist in a quick motion to see how much wet nectar falls out of the comb. if you do this directly over the hive most of the spilled nectar will quickly be cleaned up. a large splash means you have a major flow taking place and a smaller splash means the flow is minor.
 

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This test is also important before deciding whether or not honey in a frame with open cells is ripe for extraction. If any honey splashes out, you'd better wait or you're likely to find your honey fermenting in the containers after extraction. :oops:
 

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thanks efmesch for the additional elaboration...

I did a make believe (actually it was a box that had caught some rain water) 'splash test' at our most recent bee keeping club and made your point that the 'splash test' was also a quick and informal way to determine if the honey was ready for extraction. it is likely not as good as a refractometer but then again a lot of folks with a very small crop may not wish to purchase and maintain a refractometer.
 
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