First Timer, go easy! Help with hive.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bee Happy, Jun 8, 2017.

  1. Bee Happy

    Bee Happy New Member

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    We have a hive in our back yard for going on five years now. It's located under a garden shed between floor joists. A crack in foundation allowed them entrance. Year before last they had left, no activity at all. I went so far as to cut a hole in the flooring above and insert a camera and was able to take picture of developing hive. This last winter I reached in thru the access hole and pull a piece of the hive loose, it was wet and empty, I figured they were gone. Not, this spring they're back thicker than ever. Is this normal, to leave for a year or so and come back? The location is horrible, when we get a lot of rain I got a feeling I have standing water just below the hive. I've video them in action, I'm guessing I have a good thirty of so every fifteen seconds coming and going. What should I do for them to remain and be happy?
     

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  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    well short of moving them into a hive box, not sure what you can do, maybe offer some sugar water feed during a dearth, in a chicken waterer or some other safe feeder. The hive there now is not the hive that was there before, wild hives come and go.
     
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  3. Bee Happy

    Bee Happy New Member

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    Most interesting, thank you for the reply. I had no idea that wild hives exist like that!
    I'll try to improve the drainage in the area so that they may remain happy and stay put during our fairly mild winters.
     
  4. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    just for a try you can put a swarm trap and bait with lemon grass oil, by the opening on the hopes by you giving them a better place to live that they move, short of cutting the floor open and physically removing the hive into proper boxes..which may still be your best option while the hive is still small...it all depends on how much time and money you want to spend..in my area a 5 frame nuc goes from $200 to $250..so if you can get that from under your shed..whats it going to cost to fix the floor in the end and you get a nice bunch of bees..
     
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  5. Bee Happy

    Bee Happy New Member

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    Bob,
    Thank you for the addition infomation. I tempted to let them stay. We have good sized yard and would like to think we're helping the bees out by providing a decent home. In the long run, if the shed is compromised, so bee it! My main concern is that I would think it's a measurable place to spend winter, damp and wet ground dirctly underneath the hive?
     
  6. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    at this point you have nothing to loose by trying to move them, and once they are in a standard hive, you will be better off caring for them, they will be much happier and you can get some honey from them...the downside to leaving them in the shed, is you may get stung when walking on top of them and moisture is very bad for honey bees..do you have any hives to move them into yet?
     
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  7. Bee Happy

    Bee Happy New Member

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    I'd be a newbe at this. Easy way out would be to leave alone. Sounds like that would not be the best bet for them. I'll have to think this one out, to become a beekeeper or not!?
     
  8. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    im very new at it, and find it amazing what they can build, I find myself watching the hives in the back yard like tv..lol..sounds funny, but so true..
     
  9. Bluzervic

    Bluzervic New Member

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    I would watch some video on how to do a cutout, and then put on the bee suit and get started.
    You might need to learn about how to make a bee vac. In the long run doing Cutouts and catching swarms can make you some money.

    I am on my 1st couple hives this year and I am totally fascinated and learning at full speed. I just wish I could have more hives :)
     
  10. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    while beekeeping is new to me, being in business is not....one big nasty word you must remember when dealing with the public for anything..and the word is ...." liability" you will need the proper insurances before you do any type of bee removal..whether you do it for free or charge you will need to be covered by insurance..unless you have nothing ..no assets , no job , or anything anyone would want...thats the sad part of todays society...