Florida keepers---careful 'round your hives

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by LtlWilli, Oct 15, 2009.

  1. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    Yikes!!
    15 ft. Eastern Diamondback rattlesnake caught at the St. Augustine Outlet Mall.
     
  2. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Viddles! Honey roasted rattler...... :thumbsup:
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I'm from Mo. They would have to show me. Sounds like it may have been hunting jackalopes..............

    From Google.......

    The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake in North America. The record for this species is eight feet

    http://www.google.com/search?q=eastern+ ... =firefox-a
     
  4. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Could be a new record...I need pics!
     
  5. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    Charles,
    Email me at mosin53@aol.com and I'll forward the pics back.......BBBRRRRR!
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    15 foot sounds to be somewhat of an enhancement of the story I would guess.

    however.... having spent a great deal of my younger life extensively fishing the kissimmee river area of florida I would tell you that it is not a rumor that snakes and most particularly rattle snakes in the low laying menadering kissimmee river flood plain can get to be extremely large. I would guess given the nature of man that the really large one will not come within eyesight or arms reach of man... even they can recognize and will scrurry away from an extreme predator like man.
     
  7. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I sent the email with the pics twice, Charles---hope you got them.
    J. Frank Dobie wrote a lot about early Texas. In one book he writes of accounts where settlers would see one as they jostled down the dirt roads---they could see the body in the road, but not the tail or the head.---(shiver)
    Nothing like running over a snake with a riding mower----BBBRRRRTTT!!!, and you have reptilian hamburger. :thumbsup:
     
  8. Charles

    Charles New Member

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  9. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    ...Big as that officer's leg!...OMG
     
  10. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    The Snake was alittle over 7ft a 15 ft eastern diamondback would have been quite a formidable creature to mess with, with as warm as it was--bearing mind that the WORLD RECORD length is a mere 8 foot 6 inches
     
  11. rast

    rast New Member

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    First off, I can no longer prove it other than some cousins still living that saw it also. The skin has long since fell apart. In the early 70's my grandaddy killed one that over 10' long. It also bit and killed his dog before he killed it. He skint it, salted the skin and nailed it on a board, Hung it on a wall in his bedroom. It went from one wall to the other. He would have had no thought of world records or how to go about doing it. Big rattlers were not uncommon in the Tuscanooga area down here back then.
     
  12. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Hey come on guys, to qualify me, I maintained a collection of as many as 23 venomous snakes in the previous 15 years, mostly exotic ones like African Cape Cobras, Russels vipers, Gaboon Vipers--but also Eastern Diamondbacks Rattlesnakes ( Crotalus Adamanteus ), as well as Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes ( Crotalus Atrox . I studied them for over 15 years. knowing the average length of a eastern diamondback to be about 6 ft and for western diamondbacks about the same--still very impressive creatures but NOTHING CLOSE TO 10 ft, let alone 15 ft. If in deed a 10 foot snakes of ANY snake native to contential USA were found is would be considered a amazing and indeed miraculous find especially considering peoples attitude towards these rather amazing snakes. Perhaps ( yeah I noted the remarks indicating distress or disgust towards the snake ), if more would bother to learn about the biology of the snakes instead of making hamburger out of them with your lawn mover you would find out there is NOTHING to fear from them if left alone ( wait doesn't this sound so much like a argument about a colony of honeybees ). If fact if you all had your wishes granted and all snakes died at midnight tonight your would celebrate next Christmas dinner with a shotgun--required to kill all the rats and mice invading your house seeking to share in your dinner---thats a fact--is NO guesswork about that you don't have enough poison, traps, or willpower to defeat the Rodentra family without natures help . Would help to atleast try to think in logical terms, and apply intelect to what your seeing--a snake skin on a board is stretched and then tacked in place and then salted to properly dry--often substancially increacing the length and width--NEVER a way to accurately guaging the size of a snake--and people being people embellish a report to emphasize what the point they are trying to get across it. Please ( knowing it won't happen ) but try to think of snakes, all snakes as just another animal that actually has a right exist like ANY other animal, and actually want NOTHING to do with people, but we are encroaching on their hunting grounds, and habitat forcing them into smaller and smaller areas, while unintentionally providing homes for thier food sources, they want the food not us. Well enough preaching, as I suspect I am alone in this cause.
    Barry
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You're not alone. Thank You for a nice write up.
     
  14. rast

    rast New Member

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    I take no offence, I believe that about the streching and nailing too and stories growing. I started to not even post about about it, but I didn't make it up, just remember what I saw. Snakes don't bother me either as long as they go the other way.
     
  15. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    I don't think your alone on this one Barry, I'll be the first to admit I rid my place of rattlers only because my kids are running around outside. Although my little one has a respect for them I don't think he'd come out on top if he tangled with one accidentally. Bull snakes are another story, when we get one in the barn or around the house I'll relocate them to another corner of the property as they are welcome to stay.

    Did you see my post from last year when I pulled one from a pop can?

    viewtopic.php?f=21&t=15
     
  16. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Rattlesnakes are nothing to be frightened of, they don't want a conflict with people, their venom serves them as a food gathering and digestive function. To bite a person serves them only as a means of defense. The thinking is that we when bitten will survive to teach our offspring to bypass the cause of the pain and distress--little could nature have suspected that quite the opposite occurs--people believing that is thier right to control all things they see( and a few things they can't see ), that a animal no right to defend themself agianst people, but should allow themself to be destroyed peaceably. We all need to teach and preach our kids:
    1.) respect all things not demosticated, we have done a poor job in that objective--our kids seldom respect much of anything, a reflection on us as parents.
    2.) All animals big and small scaly or furred have a right to exist, with the only execption being if they represent a CLEAR and PRESENT danger. simply showing up in the borders of the yard is not a clear and present danger to anything execpt for a stray mouse or rat--use thier presence as a teaching moment.
    3.) When living in areas frequented by venomous anything, be it scorpions, snakes, spiders isn't it our responsibility to learn what these animals are really about, not rely on folks lore, and fairy tales--which mostly ore wholy inaccurate--once one really learn then you risk being truely enlightened and possibly respectful as opposed to merely scared. Fear is not a good teacher and often teaches improper responses to what should have been a simple matter to avoid.
    * as a point of prespective--we as beekeepers know that a colony of honeybees, in a open field will use close to 300 feet of straight level low flight space to the front of the colony. Someone walking within that 300 feet, say 100 feet infront would be almost certianly buzzed if not outright attacked for interferring with the incomming and outgoing bees --not in numbers atleast initially, but try to convince that person that Bees are harmless and inoffensive--no venomous snake can project a defensive/ offensive attitude that far away.
    Well preaching again--suspose someone has to.
    Barry :drinks:
     
  17. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Speaking of snakes, I was moving hives this morning and after putting them on the truck, I lifted the rubber matting. Underneath, was a ribbon snake with an orange ribbon and underside. First year small one. They are not uncommon, but are rarily seen. The last few I have ever seen had a yellow band. So I was glad to find a orange band this time.
     
  18. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Hmm... I've SEEN large, native snakes before. I'll admit, even though I knew it was a harmless rat snake, I was too afraid of it to measure the one I saw about four years ago, but it was probably close to about twice my body length and I'm over 6' and as big around as my forearm. I'm not normally afraid of snakes, but when they're that big, I'd just as soon leave them be than try to pick them up, and I'm sure it preferred not to be handled anyway.