Flour Power...

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by hlhart2001, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    photo.JPG I work at an organic grain farm and what did we find hanging out back checking out the emmer flour...some sweet little honeybees. They seemed very excited...so flour power it is! Never knew bees to be interested in flour(although I have read/heard that they will eat just about anything...hence the French rainbow honey bees). So are they just tasting it, eating it, smelling it..emmer flour(and ancient grain) is known for its sweet and nutty flavor. Just curious??
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    this time of the year bees will gather sawdust flour or about anything that resembles pollen:thumbsup:
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    If you are only seeing the occasional bee, you are seeing scout bees checking for food sources to take back to the hive. To share and communicate where the food source is located. If the bees find it useful you will see a feeding frenzy with lots of bees.
     
  4. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    The flours of barley, rye, quinoa, soy, and others are sometimes/variously used in pollen substitute patty recipes for bees, along with dried eggs, brewers' yeast, soy meal, and many other combinations of ingredients. Bees will also raid bird feeders during hard times, gathering up the leftover powdery residues of seeds and corn.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    My neighbor said they put out big piles of Rice bran? around their deer stands out here. He said on warm days the bees were all over these piles.
     
  6. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    Just found this video of guy feeding pollen and flour to his bees in the spring...he said if he didn't have pollen you can mix sand/gravel? with the flour. The emmer flour which the bees were congregating around at the organic grain farm I work at is high in protein and low in gluten,..he is just using unbleached regular flour. What does everyone think about this:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgkD1h1gTG0
     
  7. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    What's the starch content of that flour? That's what would worry me but I don't know anything about emmer flour so I don't know if that'd be a problem or not.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think Ben makes a very relevant point here. Folks seem to be putting some very odd things in bee hives these days.
     
  9. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    I am just surprised that bees will eat flour of any kind...it must be the protein and that it looks like pollen..who knows. I would not give this to the bees...rather have them eat their own honey/pollen..they know best. But I found it interesting anyway. I am learning something new everyday in the apiary world:)
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    they know best

    tecumseh...
    there is nothing that I know that suggest bees have some kind of nutritional intelligence. if bee did would they collect poison nectars and pollens?

    as to the flour I would guess.... don't really know.... purely speculating with out a doubt.... that there is some smell to the flour at a time of year when there is nothing else to gain their attention. you generally don't hear of these things when there is any significant bloom.