forager bees

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by 2kooldad, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    i was never able to find an exact written answer for this question.

    Will queenless forager bees....given no younger bees (nurse bees) in a hive, but givin a frame of brood an a queen....take care of, feed and raise the brood and queen untill nurse bees are present to do the job ??
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    In my humble opinion, when presented with any kind of an emergency situation, bees of almost any age will press into duty doing whatever is required for the survival of the colony. (I could be out in left field on this, nothing scientific to back it up).
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If given a frame of eggs and brood, forager bees will care for it and raise a new queen if laying workers haven't developed. If given a queen, without proper introduction, they will kill her.
     
  4. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    proper introduction being a candy corked queen cage i take it.....watch for balling so they dont get to her early....will they take care of a queen cell in the same manner with brood present....what will they do with a queen or queen cell if there is no brood present but have built comb ??
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They should accept a queen cell with no problem, BUT, it would be better if you could install the cell on a frame of open and capped brood. It would also give the new queen some house bees until hers emerged.
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    What about those cages that allows the introduced queen to start laying eggs in a liimited area 6 x 6 inch area causing her to generate the queen pheremone that inhibits laying workers restored equilibium in the colony. I was always under the impression that so long as laying workers are present, there is no possibility of introducing a real queen. that the standard queen introduction cage allows too quick of access when laying workers are present?
    Barry
     
  7. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    if i decide to do this experiment there wont be any laying workers present.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    it takes about 10+ days of being queenless for a hive to start developing laying workers.
     
  9. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    good to know Tec....you guys have given me good intel.......thanks (i should be writting all this down)
     
  10. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    10 days+ would that not be about the time the last of the larvae capped over to pupate. more or less sealing the fate of the colony.
     
  11. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    no fate is sealed....thats ultimently what we beeks do....alter fate....manipulate, rearange, cull, intraduce, trick and fool (did i get em all wrong...i think i spelled alter correcly...lol ) ect, ect....we are good enuff to fool 50,000 ladies into thinking a box is a tree....think about it hard enuff an anything is possible.
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    good post 2kool...

    actually the science folks tell us that laying workers are always present but it is the queen pheromone that keeps their reproduction (egg laying) suppressed.
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I agree with tec.Many times i have found drone brood along the bottom of frames in my comb honey supers. Usually in the top super with either two honey supers or comb honey supers under it. Because of the queens pheromone being weaker in the top super.Another argument for keeping a young queen with a strong pheromone. :roll: Jack
     
  14. Flyman

    Flyman New Member

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    There was an ABJ article, maybe 6+ months ago, that stated foragers (or any other class) would "revert" and do whatever job was needed. It was stated that an entire group of only foragers would become "nurse bees" as needed for the survival of the colony. The article also talked about certain attributes in the reverted nurse bees, such as the ability to produce royal jelly, would redevelop. Thought this was pretty cool.
     
  15. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    Shoot, "fool 50,000 ladies..."!!!! I tried to fool one into thinking a johnboat was a feed trough....didn't work!!!! :-| :mrgreen:

    Ed
     
  16. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    reference to fate being sealed was the colony was at a point, where hopelessly queenless--actually was in that condition about 4 days prior to that when last of larvae matured beyond 3 days old and were fed the courser diet of bee bread.
    Barry
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    2kool writes:
    will they take care of a queen cell in the same manner with brood present

    tecumseh:
    old bees can be somewhat cranky. adding a bit of unsealed brood will calm them down quite a bit... gives them larvae to feed and something to do. some folks think with introducing just a cell those curler cell protectors are a good idea since they will keep the old bees from chewing out the side of an introduced cell <doesn't happen often but it DOES happen.
     
  18. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    what if the forager bees come from another hive an are put in a new one....does this all still apply ??
     
  19. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would GUESS likely not since you might put them in there but they would be highly unlikely to stay.

    at some point queenless bees seem to get a very powerful draw from almost any hive with a queen inside.