found on the hives

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by Zookeep, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    I have 13 hives at 1 yard and almost every hive has 1 extra resident, they are all the same kind of spiders just many different colors, some all black, some almost white with emerald green, only 1 to a hive cause they are very territorial, I tried moving a spider to another hive and it was chased off almost right away, they have pocket like nests of silk in the corners of the outer cover and from the bodies found they only eat bees, they eat only a few a week it seems so no real threat and fun to watch hunt, they are the biggest jumping spiders I have ever seen, they are about 2 times the size of a worker bee.
     

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  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Zookeep, does my heart good to read that you are leaving these beauties alone to exist with the bees as Nature intended. Your reward is that the spiders will likely catch mostly the dumber or older feeble bees, thus leaving you with a more vigorous population with no honey wasted on weaker bees hanging about. Think of the spiders as ridding the colony of sluggish, old, or ill bees. Survival of the fittest! :thumbsup:
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    The first thing i do when i remove the lid off the hives is hivetool those silk bags. To many times i've found black widow spiders, and Brown recluse spiders hiding there. I've been bit two times by the Brown recluse (Not in the beeyard) and if not caught in time can be serious. Besides i'm a beekeeper and it's my job to keep my girls safe,:thumbsup: Like they say in the army, it's alright to sacrifice a few to save many as long as i'm not one of the few.:eek: I read that a worker bee will make a teaspoon of honey in it's lifetime, so 13 hives and they eat ? a week, go figure:roll:. Zoo, i guess by now you know i don't like spiders.:lol: Jack
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hey Omie, are you saying i got bit because i'm old, dumb, sluggish, and in bad health.:shock: Jack
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Are you in bad health too Jack? :lol::lol::lol:
     
  6. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    in Florida theres more bugs of all kinds per qubbic foot than anyplace else in the usa, anything that eats other bugs you learn not to kill:thumbsup: and they are taking so few bees its not worth killing something looking that cool
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm pretty selective on which bee predators I let hang about. My beautiful garden spider was a bit too successful under the hot hive, so I moved her to the grapevines in the front garden. She moved from there to my pine trees.
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Dose it hang a web or just jumps and rapes the girl or a stealth stalker with a sneak attack?
     
  9. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    the 1 I watched at work moved down the side of the hive and just sat at the side of the entrance and waited till 1 of the old guards got just a bit too close and jumped it, from what I have seen they could jump a foot or more.
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Gypsi--I'm a member of your school of action. Despite their unpleasant looks, spiders are our good friends---but that doesn't mean you have to leave them where they don't work in your favor. Removing them from the hives and placing them somewhere else serves a double purpose, helping the bees and eliminating other unwanteds from different habitats.
     
  11. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I remember when I was about 12, I was reading The Life of the Spider by Jean-Henri Fabre. Read everything about nature I could get my hands on. Meanwhile, the other girls in school were mostly reading Teen Magazine.
    Forty years later I went back to the same library and found the old musty copy of that book still on the shelves, and saw my scribbly 12 year old signature in the library card envelope glued inside the front cover. That was pretty cool.
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Just think what pleasures today's computerized libraries are taking away from the thrills of pre digital-age old-timers.:cry:
    I guess we have to take both the good and the bad in stride. :roll:
     
  13. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    I love jumping spiders! One prominent entomologist (need to look up whom) was once quoted as saying: "If the Salticidae were the size of cats, they would hunt humans"

    I once saw a large female (5/8" long) toting around a recent kill of 1 1/4"~1 1/2" long katydid.

    The one pictured looks like it could be Phidippus audax. This is one of the most common and largest species of jumping spiders in North America.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phidippus_audax
     
  14. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I sometimes find small black fuzzy jumping spiders in our house. I always leave them be, figuring they will hunt the occasional mosquito and fly.
    Once I had one in my office here at home, and it liked to perch on top of my monitor. Maybe it liked the light and warmth there. Anyway, i thought it was awfully cute walking around on the top of my screen. After a few weeks it disappeared. I miss my lil' buddy!
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    There's plenty more that they can find to keep them nourished--even in he most spotless of homes.
    Like you, spiders are sacro-sanct in my home. If anyone visiting squashes one here, they get a good lecturing.
    Sometimes my house spiders land on my computor monitor too. I have fun playing with them---they like to follow the cursor as it moves around them. I wonder what it would taste like if they ever caught it. :rolling:
     
  16. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    A tale of the boss lady and the jumping spider. To set the stage the boss lady is 4'10" and maybe 86 lbs soaking wet, has cerebral palsy which means she has to use some device to help her walk. It seems one morning when she was making coffee last spring that one of these jumping spiders decided to test its fate and jump in the general area of the boss lady:eek:. If the spiders goal was to scare her, it was a battle won,:thumbsup: but in the spiders haste it failed to take into account this would also make her mad:mad: and probably to the dismay of the spider it did not realize that a jar sitting on the oven would become it's jail. The boss lady proceed to place the jar over the spider and then walked away. I'm sure at this point the spider was contemplating it's own fate :confused:and realizing that it could not get out on ground level, it climbed up on the inside of the jar. The boss lady sad dumb a## to the spider and proceeded to turn the jar over and place the lid on. One would venture to guess at this point the story would be over, except for the fact the spider made her mad. The boss lady then proceeded to violently shake the jar and call the spider some unrepeatable names:club:. No this spider was not going to have a quick demise it was going to be torchered. The jar was placed in the middle of the dinning room table and every time the boss walked by she would again shake it violently, was this a demonstration to the other spiders? (sorta like in Australia where they sheep farmers would kill dingos and hang them on the fence) To be a good sport about this matter the boss allowed for her captive to have fresh air; meaning she would take the lid off sometimes before the shaking. After a few days and the spider having broke down and strung some webs ( presumable to soften the impact from the shaking ):rolling::rolling: it finally gave in and died not sure if it was from the shacking or if it had spun itself a noose. Moral of the story, yes I sleep with one eye opened.
     
  17. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    That's a sad story! Poor spider, why not just let it go outside? :sad:
     
  18. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Ever been bit by a Brown Recluse.:roll: it was in my wadders, something i wouldn't wish on no one. Jack
     
  19. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have 2 spider handling systems. Well 3. Jumping spider in unused window - stays put, fattens on flies.

    Jumping spider in human zone, especially small human zone, goes outdoors.

    Poisonous spider. squished immediately. We have brown recluses, black widows and now brown widows. Suspicious shiny bodied spiders with fiddle shapes definitely squished immediately.

    Outdoors is different, but I've had my children bitten by jumping spiders and they are a nasty bite even if non poisonous.
     
  20. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Yeah if it's a fuzzy jumping spider, a garden spider, etc, i know it's not venomous and I don't harm it. Local deadly spiders are pretty easy to recognize once you look at a few photos. Kill it if necessary or maybe just put it outside if it's not deadly.
    Sometimes i see a crippled or injured bee and I know it won't make it- I'll step on it quickly so it won't suffer any more. Not much fun.