Frame and foundation question

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Rjones, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. Rjones

    Rjones New Member

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    The story has to come first. I had a local guy that lost three hives to wax moths. When he found the bees gone he took the covers off and gave up. I bought all of his hives (4) and extracting equipment. He had four boxes of assembled and unassembled frames, plus five unassembled medium supers with frames. I went through all the new frames and had enough assembled frames to fill four complete hives minus two deeps. He was using wired foundation which was ruined from being left to the elements.
    Since there was almost enough new frames, I threw all the moth damaged frames in the trash instead of trying to clean all the unhatched cocoons out.
    These frames are Kelleys slotted top bar bottom groove. I use Mann Lake Frames with Rite Cell Foundation.
    The question I have is, the rite cell foundation wont fit in kelley frames, so can I cut the rite cell to fit the kelley frames and use the left over pieces as starter strips for foundationless.
     
  2. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Yes you can cut and fit the rite cell foundation.:thumbsup:
    My favourite starter strips for foundationless are paint steering sticks from HD or Lowes
    I cut them in two, lengthwise, one stick for two frames, glue it in the groove, and voila:grin:
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    For future reference the frames could have been cleaned up quite easily by putting the frames in black plastic garbage bags 6 to a bag or however many lay flat, and lay them out in the drive way and them cover with a clear poly in a few hrs the wax and ... would be melted off. Cheep mans solor wax melter. It needs to be done at the hot time of the year.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    He was using wired foundation which was ruined from being left to the elements.
    Since there was almost enough new frames, I threw all the moth damaged frames in the trash instead of trying to clean all the unhatched cocoons out.
    These frames are Kelleys slotted top bar bottom groove.

    tecumseh....
    the weather really doesn't ruin much of anything in regards to bee equipment unless it has been left out so long it is rotting into the ground. since you have with out a doubt had some freezing weather there is not much in wax moth damaged stuff that is viable since freezing temperatures kill all those nasties within about 24 hours. at this point in time I DO NOT use anything with a slot in either the top or the bottom of a frame <you are exposing yourself to a couple of problems here of which wax moth is only one likely candidate.

    I would think rite cell is hard stuff to modify although certainly anything like duracell or plain foundation or even foundation with ripple wire can be trimmed to fit almost any size frame.
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Yep, cut it to fit and carry on. The bees really do not care that much what is mixed and matched up to make their home, as long as it is pretty weather tight. I would have cleaned up the old frames also, a good scraping will have them back in order pretty quick unless the wax moth larva ate the wood up too bad.

    Apis that is a good idea on the black trash bag also!!

    I agree with tec on the slotted frames, great place for the small hive beetle to hide out in, although I still run slotted bottoms and wedge tops.
     
  6. wadehump

    wadehump New Member

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    I think you answered your question
     
  7. Rjones

    Rjones New Member

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    Please show me the way to these frames. I did clean up the frames that wasn't too bad, but the one I threw away was pretty well ate up or covered in the cocoons.
    Could I fill the grooves and slots with a caulk or silicone to solve that problem.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    ALL the stuff I now order has slotted top bars and slotted bottom bars (typically either from Mann Lake or Dadant).... I now don't even buy any wedged top bars since this just adds more work to my 'to do' list and is another place for wax moth and the small hive beetle to do their nasty business. I do want an old frame to be sound but I don't loose any sleep over the indentation wax moth make in the wood up until the point where the wood is too thin or fragile to be used 'one more time'. I generally set myself down on a pail in my drive way (to my storage shed) and take a hive tool and scrape off any wax moth stuff, making certain that the ears on the top bar and the bottom bar are structurally sound. In about 95% of old frames these are the two places where a frame is judged by me to be unusable.

    I myself do not like to waste ANYTHING so even at the point where a frame is pretty much kindling for the smoker I salvage the top bars which then get used as entrance reducers (Jeffrey Todd entrance reducers is what I call them... which I named after a Austin beekeeper who I use to converse with over the net and I then noticed in a very old American Beekeeping Journal his idea for using this bit of scrap wood).