Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many of you use metal frame rests on your woodenware?
I do, but I noticed for the first time that the price of them has climbed to 59 cents each. That's $1.20 per hive, then add taxes and shipping. I like 'em because they save wear and tear on the wooden rabbets the frames sit on but........
I am getting some pine milled right now (200 ft. @ 50 cents a lineal ft.) 9 7/8 x 7/8" and figure I can build a deep for a little over $3.50 a piece versus buying them at almost $20.00, but dang those frame rest's are expensive for what they are, little strips of metal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
983 Posts
Last time I paid 25 cents a piece, and tought it's kinda expensive.
Next time I'll go to my welder friend who has brake press, from one sheet of metal I can have made a zilion of those frame rests.
Hint, hint ;) ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,683 Posts
i dont use them myself. Never have and really couldnt tell you why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Iddee said:
9 7/8 is a 1/4 in. too deep.
Yeah Iddee, but this wood was cut last May and is only air dried so I am allowing for a little shrinkage. If I have to I can run'em through a jointer. If it was kild dried I would probably get 9 3/4". A lot easier to take a little off than put it on (don't ask me how I know this.) :oops:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey gunny:

No, I have some of those, they're just flat strips.
The ones I usually use are the ones that look like the letter "J", which gives me the proper spacing top and bottom of my frames. I split my bee space where some folks keep it either all to the top or the bottom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Ah, got it.

I haven't used the kind you're talking about, but I inherited some older boxes from a retiring beek, and they had the ones with the notches. I put some frames in (testing the fit) when I was cleaning the boxes up, but didn't like them cause they had sharp edges. I mean sharp enough to damage the top of the frame. Plus, they didn't fit tightly the whole length, leaving gaps that I'm sure SHBs would love. I pulled them all off. I may-just out of curiosity-try the ones you're talking about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
any box that arrives here with them attached quickly get ripped out.

you do of course need to adjust the cut of the rabbit/cleat for the small difference.

what kind of wear are you experiencing along this rabbit/cleat area? <I am just having a hard time imagining what could be happening here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I always figured these were to be used from the moment I first started keeping. It made sense that it would preserve the rabbet/cleat from wear. It was just something I never really questioned.
The other thing is that the rests I use actually lift the frames clear of the rabbet by about an 1/8",(maybe more) and perhaps this doesn't allow the bees to propolize it as bad? It also splits the bee space between boxes evenly. I have on occasion "pressed into duty" :oops: boxes that haven't had the rests and sure enough the bees start to propolize those frames (now lower) to the tops of the frames below.
This brings me to another question, I wonder how most of you set your boxes up as far as bee space, all on top, all on bottom, or split? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
I use them on my boxes and love them. I use the L-shaped rests instead of the -J shaped ones. The -J shaped ones offset the bee space between the top and bottom of the frames between boxes if you don't have them on EVERY box on that hive. I think it makes it easier to pry out the frames from boxes with metal frame rests than with no rest at all.
Just my .02 cents...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
How about some bi-lingual confusion ??

I use frame rests (frames runners) in my brood boxes. I use the metal strips with cut-outs (castellations) in my supers. My hives came with Bottom bee space and I have kept it. The castellations are easier to fit since the notch is the same depth as the frame lug. With the frame runners, to get the right height I have to twiddle around with a spare top bar and a couple of push pins. Once nailed at the correct height, they stay. Plastic frame runners are available but I don't like them.

May the Lord have pity on the poor beginner reading this technical stuff.

This forum has sooo many interesting posts that I marvel at how some of you keep up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
since I have this collection of boxes some manufactured and some home made I just decided that I needed to deal with some top bars and bottom bars being stuck together. I could loose some sleep over this detail... but I will likely not.

good post Barbarian... we both speak english, yet still don't understand what the other fellow is saying???

for most folks Perry the question as to up or down space only really matters if you have migratory covers. it has little net effect if you are using an inner cover/outer cover set up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,042 Posts
The way I look at it down here, the more propolizing I have in the frame rest area is less room for SHB to hide in, same with the corners of the boxes, quit scraping them to a pretty 90 degree also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,056 Posts
I bought some of the "L" shaped rest for my deeps and remain as the last component to install. Two things holding me back. First, they don't extend the full length and second, I am hard pressed to find a nail small enough to avoid penetrating the rabbet to the outside. Glue them on? Crown staple? I would like to skip them honestly. Looks like the concensus here is split evenly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,996 Posts
Turn them over and let the frame rest on top them rather than on the toe. Then you nail into 3/4 in. wood and straight down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,056 Posts
Of course...I must be tired...I think I tried that one other time but it hung over a 32 or so...wasn't sure if that would matter...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Here is an example of how they are installed:

First pic is of two types of frame rests.
The one on the left is a J type (which lifts the frames slightly)
The one on the right is the L type.



The next pic is of the 9 frame variety (or as Barbarian called them, Castellation) These are most commonly used in honey supers, causing the bees to draw comb out a little further making them easier to uncap.



And last pics are of how they are installed (by me anyways).



Iddee, our common thickness of hive material up here is 7/8" so when you buy new hive material they come with 5/8" nails for installing frame rests. It has never occured to me to nail them in a downward fashion. I find them easier to remove when installed this way when scorching or when replacing a beat up box. I guess either way will work though.
Hope this helps.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top