frames after extraction

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by notyet, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. notyet

    notyet New Member

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    Hi,

    I have 2 beginner questions.

    1. after honey extraction I returned the frames to the bees for cleaning. Now that the frames are clean, when I return them to the hive in the spring do I leave the remaining wax cells on the frame? These are plastic base frames.

    2. my hives are in the back yard of my house, about 50 ft from my house. At night, when the lights come on I get bees crashing into the windows. Is this normal behaviour? If it is I guess i"ll have to throw up some blinds to block thge light.

    cheers
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    1. Check with the beekeeper in your area... Perry or one of your Canadian neighbors and they can give you some date when the honey supers are normally removed and the hive is inspected and set up for the winter. once the comb is drawn you return it to the hive just as is and this gives the bees a large start in capturing next years crop. if you have just started from foundation (wax or plastic) you will really be amazed at how fast come next spring a hive can fill existing comb.

    2. The bees at the front entry or any gap in the box are drawn to the light in your house. Some lights like florence and such are worst than other in doing this.... they are orientating on the light as if it were the sun. a blind would work as would turning the entrance in another direction (but quite likely at your location never north).
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Once you have extracted your frames and the bees have cleaned them up just safely store them. Do not remove the wax on the plastic foundation, as tecumseh says it will give your bees a tremendous advantage next year.
    Given that you folks rarely have what a normal person calls winter there (I know, I lived there :wink:) you may want to spray your comb with BT (available from Sundance on this forum) or purchase some moth balls (careful here) do not buy regular moth balls. There are purpose moth deterrent available through a beekeeping supply store. Follow instruction, something like stacking boxes and placing crystals on a tray on the top super, and be sure to air them out properly in the spring.
    If you manage to get to the Surrey Beekeeping clubs meeting you may get good advice there as well as here.
     
  4. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    What you need to look for is the primary ingredient of the moth balls (or moth crystals). DO NOT buy those whose primary ingredient is naphthalene. You want to get those that are made with para-dichlorobenzene.

    As far north as you are, you could probably store them without chemicals. I'm well south of you, but I usually leave empty supers on top of the inner cover until the nights get cool, then I remove them for the winter.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Up in Canada we are not effected by the greater wax moth that is prevalent in the states, but we get the codling moth that infests fruit trees but even if they get in to the supers they only do superficial damage and the bees can clean them out and repair the damage easily.
    The moth lays eggs in cracks and gaps in and between supers, then the larva hatches and enters into the supers looking for food. By placing sheets of news paper between the supers when storing them will stop the moths and larva from entering the supers.
    As for bees bouncing off your window Bees general don't fly after dusk unless the light source is extremely bright, or the bees are getting adjutated and are leaving the hive and flying to the light of the window. Skunks, Raccoons, Woodpeckers. Place a screen in front of the hive to block the light from hitting the hive entrance and beading areas on the front of the hive.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
     

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  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Perry you have to much time on your hands if you can take the time to color stack your suppers. Its amazing how effective the news paper works for the moths up here. In the Okanagan the government\fruit growers have been releasing [FONT=&quot]sterile[/FONT] moths to mate with wild as a control. They monater and trmove any trees that are not maintained and sprayed. Most of the experts don't realize that they can adapt to other food sources than fruit on trees like stored honey supers.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :lol: :rolling: :rotfl: :thumbsup:
     
  9. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    If we are keeping supers in a controlled environment such as a room in my house, is it necessary to use the spray or other deterrants?
     
  10. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Here is a statement from Michael Bush, beekeeper and author:

    I can only imagine what that must be like! :shock: