Frost / Freeze and fruit trees

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Ray, May 15, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Supposedly, frost kills the blossoms on some(?) fruit trees.
    The choke cherries and feral apple trees were / are in full bloom. The apple trees still have some flower buds unopened, the choke cherries have been open for awhile.
    We had a freeze the evening of the 12. The Black Walnut trees have shoots a few inches long and BROWN!
    The bees (honeybees, bumblebees and native pollinators) are working the fruit trees and standing down wind of them they smell great.The hives even have a pleasant aroma.
    Do bees harvest off of 'dead' blossoms?:?:
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    why not watch and tell us???? I have no idea about nectar but at least here in the fall of the year they do seem to collect a good bit of pollen from native wildflowers.
     

  3. Ray

    Ray Member

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    To tell the truth; I'm confused!
    The local Black Walnut's dead, 'new growth' prove we had a freeze. The Choke Cherry trees are losing their blossom's petals, I'm assuming because they are pollinated:dontknow:. The Apple trees are still smelling good, and the bees are still working them. The freeze should have killed them though,:confused: but they still are very fragrant. My bees are still bringing in lots of pollen, not all of it dandelion.
    I'll keep ya'all posted!
     
  4. Ray

    Ray Member

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    This really messes with what I thought was fact.
    A hard freeze should have killed the blossoms and dead blossoms don't make fruit! My original post was based on that premise. I was curious, as to whether the bees could salvage anything from these 'dead' blossoms.
    The local apple and wild cherry trees, weathered the freeze and are producing fruit. The bees had a great harvest of nectar and pollen, from both.
    The walnuts, ashes and some oaks have recovered and are leafing out, but, their dead new growth proves that there was a freeze.
    All in all, I would rather have an apple, than know the answer.:grin:
     
  5. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    It has been my experience that a light frost will do minimal damage if the temperature warms back up the following day. It needs to be down to around 26F for a while to have a real freeze that has maximum damage. Of course, different plants have different damage thresholds, too.