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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
figured id post this here...other people might want to know the answers too.

Im self taught in lots of things...bees too...some things ya cant find in books though...ya have to do/see them for your self...my problem is i'll see it an not know...then kill myself trying to figure it out....so here goes.

My bees hang out on the front of the hive all the time in large numbers...less in the day but not always...i've heard they will do this just prior to swarming...will it be obvious when they do this ??

if the little gray bees that just hatched are the nurse bees...what others are in there an why do i care...queens an drones are no brainers...but i heard the are a few others comprised of the workers besides nurse bees.

What damage does opening an inspecting a hive do...if we are supposed to leave them bee (snicker) for weeks at a time...which i dont cuz i wanna know whats going on till i learn to read ''the front door''...id like to know exactly what harm im doing, or, is this just beek lore.

Why do they swarm around the hive a couple of times a day...i figure it must be newer bees trying out their wings and learning their hive location...maybe taking a cleansing flight...just not sure.

Feel free to add stuff yall :/
 

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My bees hang out on the front of the hive all the time in large numbers...less in the day but not always...i've heard they will do this just prior to swarming...will it be obvious when they do this ??

It's called bearding. They send some outside to allow the inside temp to cool.

if the little gray bees that just hatched are the nurse bees...what others are in there an why do i care...queens an drones are no brainers...but i heard the are a few others comprised of the workers besides nurse bees.

House cleaners, air conditioners, honey processors, janitors, guards, ETC.

What damage does opening an inspecting a hive do...if we are supposed to leave them bee (snicker) for weeks at a time...which i dont cuz i wanna know whats going on till i learn to read ''the front door''...id like to know exactly what harm im doing, or, is this just beek lore.


It breaks their routine, excites them, puts them on guard, and then it takes time for them to undo the damage you did to the arrangement and seal within the hive, Some say it takes 3 days for them to fully recoup from an inspection.

Why do they swarm around the hive a couple of times a day...i figure it must be newer bees trying out their wings and learning their hive location...maybe taking a cleansing flight...just not sure.

You are correct there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so they dont mass on the side of the box when they swarm ??

(I dont know how to do the quote thingy yet)

lmbo....air conditioners...lol...which ones can i train to fetch me a beer ;) seriously though...i dont need to be concerned with the others jobs as far as manipulations an stuff as long as there are plenty of new bees...do I ??

So the damage is mostly mental...im not physicly doing any damage except to the hive seal...good !!!
 

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Some bees that will bring water back to the hive and place it around inside, others will fan it to make it evaporate creating a cooling effect, bees will stand at the entrance and fan in while others will fan air out creating circulation with in the hive.

The inside temp will be maintained at around 95* F with a humidity level of 30 to 40 percent, year round.
 

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Every time you go in and move frames around your gonna break some burr comb/cell caps and move things around a bit and it takes time for them to get things fixed and back the way THEY want it. Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
lol....well then one of my hives is gonna bee busy for the next three days...i took it apart and moved all the frames around...did everything but put a mint on the pillow...funny...shes the smallest queen ive got...dont look big enuff that her butt would make it to the bottom of a cell to lay an egg...shes half the size of my other queens...but man is she layen eggs...whoopen all the other queens...first four frames were solid brood...no room even for honey above the eggs....who'da thunk it :/
 

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a kooldad snip..
funny...shes the smallest queen ive got.

tecumseh:
queens do come in various sizes but almost invariable when some new bee keeper sees and then describes a 'very small queen' this translates into the queen being relatively new. as time goes by the new queen is constantly being fed and her abdomen grow significantly. some folks may even employ some culling of queens based upon shape and size.. I think as long as her laying is acceptable then she is also.
 

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One item not mentioned about the "damage" of inspecting a hive is the chance that you'll lose the queen. She can be squashed (by rolling as a frame is lifted carelessly), she can fall off a frame onto the ground and not be able to find her way back into the hive, (which is why you should always hold frames over the hive while examinig them) and if she is young and not yet mated, she can sometimes either fly away or be "balled" by a batch of unhappy over-sensitive bees.
 

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efmesch makes a good point. Holding frames over the hive is good practice. I have caught myself from time to time turning away in order to get sun over my shoulder to see them darn eggs (darn progressive lenses) and then realize that I am holding the frame over tall grass, not a good idea!

Oh, and by the way efmesch, I see this is your first post! Welcome to our friendly little corner of the bee forum world. A great place to ask questions and offer advice (such as you did with your first post) Thanks! :mrgreen:
 

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Thanks for your welcome PerryBee. Seeing that you are from Nova Scotia answers a question that I asked myself when I registered--"is this site limited to local beekeepers and local topics of interest?"
Seeing you here tells me that this site should carry a wealth of "international" bee infomation.
Live and learn!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
yup on the frame over the hive...cept i break that rule all the time...at least with 2 of the hives...its just too hard to see into the cells under that magnolia tree...an i hate the new veil i got...even in the sun its to hard to see into the cells with it on...the 2 veils ive got both have the same metal screen mesh but the new one seems to block out little things so i end up taking it off after a minute or two...that queen is just small...she is first of 3 queens i got from the origanal feral queen...her two sisters are twice her size and she is in the strongest hive i have...she is also darker...not as dark as the carny queens but not the yellow red color of her 2 kansas corn fed sisters...they are honkers...but i dont care cuz shes out laying them and the hive isnt ill tempered...i rearanged the frames to center the brood and put a fresh frame in the middle to get worked up...dont want her getting cramped for room...also gave her a new deep on top with fresh frames...that hive seems not to mind mixed frames of wood/plasticell and 100% plastic perico so im useing them to start putting comb on the perico frames and then giveing them to the other hives...i got some other wood an plasticell frames that need comb built but the carnys wont touch them...i dont think they will for awhile...they are in a top deep and the bottom deep isnt filled out yet cause i just split them...maybe i'll take it back off an let em fill out the bottom before i give it back...trial an error...what ya gonna do but learn right...honered to get your first post man...what kinda bees you got...arent they alittle grouchy in your neck O the woods ???
 

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Yes, it is definitely an international forum.An entomologist from Israel is ESPECIALLY welcome. Thank you for joining and I hope you like it well enough to stay.
 

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2kooldad: I think you're being wise, taking out the plastic frames while you have empty space down below. From my limited experience with plastic frames, bees only accept them as a last choice--and that, only if the nectar is really coming in and they're hard up for space in which to put it. Your key words are "trial and error". One of the many nice things I've found about beekeeping is that the little critters always can be counted on to pull a surprise on you. As long as you're in it for pleasure you've got nothing to lose by experimenting.
 

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efmesch writes:
One of the many nice things I've found about beekeeping is that the little critters always can be counted on to pull a surprise on you. As long as you're in it for pleasure you've got nothing to lose by experimenting.

tecumseh:
even after 50 years they will from time to time show you something new or totally unexplainable.

welcome to the forum efmesch.
 

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Thanks for the greeting. This looks like a really nice group of people.
 

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ef, It would be really nice if you would post in introductions and tell a little about yourself. I think your resume is fantastic, but I don't want to tell any more than you want told.
 
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