Geographical question

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crackerbee, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    When I got my first hive 4/01/11 that was started from a 5 frame nuc,I asked the guy I bought them from when and how much to feed them.He said feed them 1:1 for about 2 weeks and after that they should be alright to bring in plenty for themselves.Then he said you will probably start feeding again in early summer,but didn't say when exactly or why,and also didn't mention anything regarding whether or not to feed in the fall either.

    Maybe someone that lives close to me near central Florida can answer this because what I have read is that it depends on what's blooming in my area and when.I've not gotten into the part of what blooms and when as of yet in my bee studies.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "start feeding again in early summer"?
    I am not sure why one would do that unless there is a period where there is a dearth. Fall feeding to help boost hives that are light on stores is not unusual.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Feed until the hive weighs 60 lb., woodenware and all. Then heft the hive weekly and feed enough to keep it that way. It can be approx. Just lift on it. If it lifts easily, feed.
     
  4. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    Is that method good for all seasons Iddee?Also I have 1 super on 4 of my five hives,does the 60 lb. include those or maybe a little more?
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    you only want the hive bodies where the brood nest is located to weight 60lbs remeber if you take the supers and that is where all the weight is there will not be a chance for them to make it through a winter unless you feed. I usually feed new hives until they got 2 boxes drawn and plenty of stores then i super them up for the flow. once I pull honey i will heft the hives to see if they are light if so I will feed again until they are up to weight usually by that time our fall flow is on and I pull the feed and go back to adding supers when i pull honey from the fall flow i do the same thing except i feed them 2:1 instead of 1:1 i try to get my hives up around 100 lbs for the winter but remember im in kansas you are in florida so there is a difference in climates,
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    yes I think your question is much about geography. you could avoid the mid summer feeding by moving the hives around a bit. this is likely economically not doable if you have a limited number of hives (due to the fixed cost of a move). in the old days we would have move the hives a total of 4 to 5 times a year and would have moved them from the southern portion of Florida to the southern edge of Georgia.

    since the hive you mentioned is new I would suggest you add just a bit of feed (during the dearth) to keep it constantly growing. I don't know how to emphasize the 'just a bit' enough. like the bears said... not to hot and not too cold, but just right. by fall (and with rains) you should be seeing some small flow (and most particularly at your location where there are lots of winter vegetable growers).
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A bottom board, deep box with 10 frames, an inner and an outer lid weigh approx. 35 lb. A hive should have a minimum 25 lb. wax, honey, bees and pollen at all times. More is better.