Getting quized

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by alleyyooper, Jan 30, 2010.

  1. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    We got the new Kelley catalog this week, there is a write up at the end of the queen rearing supplys talking about useing a double screen. I have used one when doing splits for years installing a NEW queen useing a full frame home made queen cage on drawn comb.
    [​IMG]

    So Kare is reading it giving me the 30 question thing. Why would the bees build queen cells if there is a queen in the bottom box was the biggest one. I told her I felt it must be if the bees are in the swarm mode.
    Appeard to me after a quick look at the article.

    Any thoughts?

    Kelleys catalog first of the season.


    :mrgreen: Al
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The worker bees MUST be able to touch the queen now and then to stay attached to her. Smell alone isn't enough. If they can't touch her, they will consider themselves queenless. That's why they build the queen cells.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    the double screen has two layer of mesh (window screen works best here) seperated by a strip of wood (maybe 3/8" inch thick. it kind of acts like a cloak board but you still have the screen for ventilation. the 'idea' (in both) is the bees in the two boxs cannot exchange queen phromon thru the two layers of screen (cloak board incert).

    you manipulate the two hive bodies and place the queen below and honey and pollen above with one frame of very green brood. you then set in place a queen excluder and the nurse bees move upwards to cover the green brood. typically you also provide a front and top (back and front) entrance at this time. the double screen can (I think the one in your picture does) have an entrance on one side. at the point at which you remove the queen excluder and place on the double screen you flip the hive entrances front to back to throw the field bees into the upper box to crowd this portion of the box somewhat. maybe 6 to 12 hours later you pull the one frame of green brood and place in a bar of queen cells.

    once the cells are started you put the queen excluder back in place.

    I first read about the procedure from Sue Colby who watched it being used in New Zealand.

    hope that helps?
     
  4. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    The touching part is what I told Kare. I don't use any queen excluders.
    Just a double deep on a screen bottom board, a double screen board, then the deep with the brood and either new caged queen or one our new queens in a full frame home made queen cage

    [​IMG]

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  5. fatbeeman

    fatbeeman New Member

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    there is lot of ways to make queen cells or queens the easy way is in 5 frame nuc's box just over crowd them and feed. just cut out the cells you need. but for a large operation grafting might be more suitable.
    Don
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    at your location a double screen is much more likely to be used for overwintering nucs above a strong hive (as it appears your picture suggest). here they make good moving screens during the very hottest time of the year.
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Mostly why we even use the double screen at all on a new clony is to help heat the new colony till they build up enough numbers to do the job them selves. We can buy queens and have them in the new colony before we have drones to mate our new queen.

    :mrgreen: Al