good news: not swarming. bad news: no queen

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by me2pl, May 1, 2013.

  1. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    so i recently came back to this forum due to weird behavior from a captured swarm. after discussion it appeared as though the swarm was in the late stages of swarming.
    two days of 30 mph winds later we open the hive to discover some surprises.
    there was no queen: perhaps she has already swarmed and left? there was no drop in the number of bees that might indicate a swarm
    there was no brood: ok, so the queen must have died or lost track of her priorities and left without any planning for her children
    there were TONS of drones:i really have no idea. falls along swarming lines?
    there was one emergency queen cell: only one? and why isn't it in the normal swarm cell area?

    i could really use a hand on figuring out exactly what may have happened here
    here's a link to my prior post about this hive: http://www.beekeepingforums.com/threads/9528-Swarm-is-swarming-maybe-not
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Leave it alone for two weeks and check again. It sounds like the new queen is getting ready to start laying. Look for pollen going in on the worker's legs. That will enforce the thought.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    queen cells can appear almost anywhere. classically swarm cells (# 1 reason for the creation of queen cells) appear on the margin (all around the edges but most notable around the bottom bars) of the brood nest and superscedure cells (#2 reason) tend to be somewhat within and higher up in the central brood area... emergency cells pretty much follow the same pattern (#3 reason) as superscedure cells. none of these man made rules do 'the girls' listen too so actually any and all can appear almost anywhere. there is some relationship between the number of cells and the population of the hive... so swarm cells are typically more numerous than cells raised due to superscedure or emergency reasons.

    oh yea... what Iddee said.... often times ahead of the queen laying you can see areas of polished cells which the bees have prepared prior to the queen beginning to lay. not only will circular areas on the face of the frame appear to have a sheen you may also notice that once they are polished the worker bees have the tendency to not walk across these areas.... so they become quite obvious due to 'no bee' being there.
     
  4. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    the new queen hasn't hatched yet, should we still wait?
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    that is about you best option. sometime patience pays off.
     
  6. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    ok, thanks for the help. i must say that it is a very healthy hive, and they seem to be settling in just fine.
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That is always a good sign