Goodbye, cruel words: English. It's dead to me.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Charles, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    It looks like proper English has unofficially died:

    Excerpt:
    Whole article:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 04476.html

    Someone call Al :eek:

    Warning: there are some pop ups
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    some English and Journalism major need to get a life. or perhaps reflect on old Joe Namath's line in regards to his college major to obtain a bit more reasonable view of their calling.

    as far as I can tell English has (in the modern era) been a fairly fluid language that has been able to change constantly. this is at least one reason why the English language has survived this long as the world's most dominate language. I suspect once any language is placed in a straight jacket it is well on it way to being a dead language like Latin*.

    *Latin may be a dead language, but this does not imply that it is useless.
     

  3. cow pollinater

    cow pollinater New Member

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    I used to write alot and was an English major for a while waaaay back when I still saw value in a college degree... I gave it all up so I could say what was really on my mind. :thumbsup: Someday smilies will be added to the dictionary. :roll:
     
  4. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I still like proper English. I've lived in Pennsylvania for 15 years now, and it still grates on me when someone local says something like "the house needs painted" or "the car needs fixed." Argh! This area of PA has lost "to be"!
     
  5. beekeeperhelper

    beekeeperhelper New Member

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    Proper English will always be a preferred means of communication. We will still have idioms, regional usages, and that awful LOL (it took me most of a day to figure out what LOL meant) and its (notice, no apostrophe) ilk. However, standard English will still be used for clear communication.
    I personally speak and write three languages: English, Spanish, and Texan. Texan was the hardest to learn to speak and pronounce. My introduction to it was at a motel when I was asked, "Whar's t' ahs machine?" Having no idea what was said, much less intended, I motioned vaguely down the hall. I have improved since then, but not much. "Jeet yit" still gives me pause. I like most Texans, and now can understand upwards of half a conversation. Many people speaking to me think I'm simple-minded. They may not be wrong.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well beekeeperhelper my question to your concerns the proper use of the Texan language. is ya'll singular or plural?

    and yes the Texas Language can stimulate a lot of conversation... and most especially with the non natives.
     
  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Here'un SW Mo. is'n English teachers nightmare.We'uns don't don't realize it untiles we travel outside our area. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  8. beekeeperhelper

    beekeeperhelper New Member

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    Tecumseh, I'm surprised you had to ask! Y'all is singular, all y'all is plural. I'm getting better at speaking Texan (I no longer look for a large galvanized tub when someone mentions "stock tank" and I have learned that "bless your heart" may not be much of a compliment!) and the native Texans are very patient with my language disability.
     
  9. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Okay, what's a "stock tank"?
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    it what them thar cows drinks out of, sheeesh, don't you yankees know nuttun!! :lol: :lol:
     
  11. beekeeperhelper

    beekeeperhelper New Member

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    Hobie, a "stock tank" is a pond. Most farms and ranches have at least one man-made pond since Texas doesn't come provided with natural ones. I have no idea why it's called a tank.
    I'm still trying to discover why Texans "mash" a button rather than "push" a button.
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    That's what they call them in Texas, here in SW Mo. a 100 gal. or more, galvanized tub filled with water is a stock tank. Jack
     
  13. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    And don't forget, "far" is something burning up and "yonner" is over there. ;) Folks had great fun trying to teach this Yankee how to speak when he moved here. And after 12 or so years, they still can't understand me. I think Kinky said, "Don't worry if you can't understand us. We can't understand you either."

    Walt
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    ah I see Walt is also a Kinky fan...

    to Hobie on stock tank... farm water impoundments are built to hold water for grazing livestock. in a place where you have relief in the terrain you would build a 'pond' in a gully or between two small hills by constructing a dam. in a place with no relief you build a square shaped hole in the ground to catch the water and these are called tanks. almost all of these are government subsidized.