Got a bad feeling...

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bens-Bees, Apr 27, 2011.

  1. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Something just dawned on me... gave me a bad feeling... I've been through the hives up in my outyard latey and pried apart all of the boxes so none of them are glued together well... then we had a strong thunderstorm roll through with high winds... and right now I can't get images of the hives being blown over from my mind... I really want to go check on them to make sure they haven't all blown over.
     
  2. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Good luck. I've weighed mine down since the top cover and inner cover blew off during our last storm. Still thinking about buying some of the nylon web straps and making a better job of it.
     

  3. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yep, at least they are on pallets with W clips so the bottom boxes at least should still be there... and they are up against a wind-break, so maybe... just maybe they made it... but that was a fierce wind... and I'm still worried.
     
  4. beecause

    beecause New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have stressed out many nights at work and at home about my beehives being blown over in hight winds. To date the worst that happened was the telescoping lids being blown off. It takes some serious wind to take the telescoping lid and a ten or fifteen pound rock off. Amazingly the hives dont tip over and the inner cover sticks on due to propolis. For this reason is a storm is coming it is best to not crack open the hives if you can wait so you dont break the proposlis seal.

    I have thought about strapping them down but thats one more expense and one more job to do every time you do an inspection. Bears are a bigger problem.
     
  5. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's the problem, I broke all the propolis seals earlier that day. I'm not very convinced that they had a chance to re-seal everything. I still didn't get a chance to go up there today to check on them but I will tomorrow morning... even if it's still storming.
     
  6. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    well, I got up to the yard today... nothing out of place at all... even though nothing was propalized.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Musta said your prayers right that time..
     
  8. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I know it... looked like one storm hit that yard dead-on from the radar last night... and I didn't even have bricks on the lids or nothing... in fact, as a whole our family faired pretty well... seeing all kinds of damage elsewhere, lots of hail damaged vehicles, I was at work the wife at home and neither vehicle got damaged, and no damage to the home or the bees... that's something considering how hard the rest of the area got hammered by those storms.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Bens..
    once the bees have throughly propolized the cracks just about any warm day resets the seal. in constant cold weather of course the seal is not remade and is a good reason to limit winter time manipulations.
     
  10. beecause

    beecause New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Im glad to hear everything turned out ok. Make sure you get some heavy bricks or rocks hone those lids or you will not be so lucky sooner or later.
     
  11. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We had some pretty bad winds in my area over the week due to the storms too. All I kept thinking about was a tornado hitting and creating a gigantic bee swarm. :chased:

    I use the straps to keep the hives tied down and they seem to work very well. This morning I went out to check the feeders and it took no time at all. The type of straps I use have the quick release catches that you press and then slide the strap. To tie them back down it only takes sliding the strap and pulling down tight. The expense is not too bad, not considering what I have tied up in each hive. The straps came from Lowes and have a camoflage print on them. That's so no one notices the hives are there. :rotfl:
     

    Attached Files:

  12. beecause

    beecause New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Dbure

    Would you mind publishing a close up pic of those straps. I would use em if they were quick and not nightmare like you say!
     
  13. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Dbure, what do you have your straps anchored to?
     
  14. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Because and Bens-Bees. Here are links to the straps and anchors at Lowes' website. The straps come in a package of 2 for $12.97 which would cover 2 hives, and the anchors were $3.97 each. If you have 2 hives you can share one anchor in the middle if they are close to each other and one on the outer side of each. I will try and get my husband to take more close up pics a little later today and post them for you. He took the eye of one of the anchors and slipped it through the eye of one of the hooks instead of using the actual hook. That eliminated the hook slipping of when the strap was undone. If that is hard to visualize I will see if he can get an upclose of it for you.

    They seem pretty sturdy and tight. I can't say they would hold up to a serious tornado like we saw this past week in Alabama, but they should keep high winds and small animals like coons and skunks from tumping the hives over. I like the quick release because with gloves on it does not get in the way like a ratchet type strap. You just pull them back and they are tight.

    Straps:
    http://www.lowes.com/pd_263441-37340-2C ... &langId=-1
    Anchors:
    http://www.lowes.com/pd_319249-16603-91 ... imal%2Btie:
     
  15. beecause

    beecause New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So these are not ratchet style? I hate ratchet straps, they always just seem to turn into a night mare. If you can just pull them tight and release the strap with a lever then I would be a fan of these real quick.

    Thanks for post.
     
  16. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    They sell at flea markets for 2 to 3 dollars per pair. Shop around.
     
  17. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks, I'll have to check into that... I have a ton of ratchet straps as I've been buying them from Wal-Mart for a while now and I love them... they are so useful. I've used them for everything from holding hives together to lifting bee-trees into the bed of my truck.
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    And when you want to tighten one on something, you will continue to use the ratchet strap. The non-ratchet is useful for holding, but is totally useless for tightening.
     
  19. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah, but considering that the ratchet straps go for 4 for $15, it wouldn't make much sense for me to buy nonratcheting straps just for this application at 2 for $12.
     
  20. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, by all means do shop around. I know you can get these cheaper, but if you need it right away and have no time to shop this is what I used because it was readily available. You might also check with Tractor Supply or other farm stores. What I like about the straps not being ratchet type is that with gloves on they release and tighten easily. With my luck I would get my gloves caught up in the ratchet and yank the whole thing over. :shock:

    You can get heavier anchors and heavier rated straps. It all depends on how secure you think you need them. The only security against bears is probably going to be some kind of electric fencing, but some kind of anchor and strap system will probably stand up to small animals and strong winds. So far so good. I hope I never have to eat my words. :dontknow: