Gotta bee a better way!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by PerryBee, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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  2. Hawkster

    Hawkster New Member

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    looks like it is this guy, is it true that florida ag tells people to not call beekeepers to remove bees ?
    http://williethebeeman.com
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a hammer is not a subtle tool! The banging certainly didn't get 'the girls' stirred up?
     
  4. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    I am still not compleatly clear if we are or are not allowed to get feral bees....i do it anyways an dont see any reason to stop...so im not i spose i'll have to be a gorrilla beekeeper if its outlawed cause bees are exspencive...lol...i cant view the link...it just freezes my phone up so i dont know what yall are talking about yet...what happened ???
     
  5. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Forgiveness is easier to get than permission. Why wouldn't you be allowed?

    I have heard of people who have gotten employment w/ extreminators. They then are covered insurancewise by the exterminator. And are more "official". Maybe you might want to check out that option. I bet you'd get lots of calls. Imagine getting paid to remove bees. Nice,eh?
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I have seen other videos of this outfit before. They are destructive idiots who should not be allowed to be in business. I would just as soon hire a mad gorilla to remodel my house, as to have them remove bees.

    2k, it is my understanding that the state "recommends" all feral bees be killed, due to the "possibility" of AHB, but is not the law.
     
  7. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    yea....its kinda iffy...im not spose to say ''i caught feral bees'' to the inspector or he'll...i dont know what....im not posta let my bees make queens cause if the inspector finds out....i dont know what....but the impression didnt sound good....an i cant say what i wanna say cause the inspector might get in trouble....i will say it was a person of an offical capacity that told me the first half of that an the second part was from a very reliable sorce that you know Iddee....that deals with the same offical person who...by the way...doesnt seem to agree with officals more offical than himself....to read the state website it would seem that its not a law but a strong request to follow their suggestions....but i never saw the ''what'' after the ''or else''...it is because of AHB but it just doesnt make sence...they wanna flood the air with drones that are not AHB to out number them (AHB) an drowned out the gene pool...but they want you to do it with only certified marked clipped bred queens from certified breeders an then they want you to change out the queens once or twice a year if i read it right....i think the guy making the rules must own a queen breeding program someplace cause that could get expencive fast....Americasbeekeeper would know the rules much better than me cause i always get them messed up it seems....i dont see why a feral bee drone wouldnt work as well as any other bee for drownding out the gene pool...they are area adapted....any natural progress twords pest resistance will be lost by killing them off an then the new gene pool would have to start over the natural process of elimination....its like cutting off you foot cause your toe hurts...just my opinion tho :/
     
  8. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    According to the person that I spoke with in Gainesville, when I called to have my hives inspected, all swarms south of I-4 should be destroyed. The reason given was that "most" were AHB.
    So when you talk to the inspector, just tell him that your bees came from "feral" hives. You can tell the difference between European and AHB if they have built a hive.
    I will continue to retrieve the swarms and hives from out here at work and if I do get a AHB swarm, I plan on re-queening and then we will see what happens. Even though we are south of I-4. :eek:
    The inspector was supposed to inspect my hives this morning, but it was 32 degrees and it did not happen. He is retiring at the end of the month and we are supposed to be getting an inspector for our area in February. My name should be on the top of her list when she takes over.
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Maybe it's just me, but when I clicked on this guys website http://williethebeeman.com/ what comes up kinda pi$$es me off.
    This guy looks altogether too happy about what it is he does, (exterminate).

    I realize people gotta earn a livin but.................
    I dunno, maybe I'm getting soft with age! :(
     
  10. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    how can you tell the diffrence after they build the hive....except they'll all be outside of it divebombing you....i never heard there was a diffrence in the hive itself....or is that what you mean about their hive defence ?? What i need to know is how defencive they are at me walking up with no disturbance....thats what worries me at work....i'll see em first but after i see em i have to locate an mark them....an now that im a beekeeper hopefully get the builder to let me remove them....how close can i get to them before they get mad....feral bees i go right up to no problem ever... AHB i havent delt with...yet....but I-4 isnt that far south an the AHB swarms are already here according to the inspector.
     
  11. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    The only difference in the hive in the wild is the way they build their comb. AHB tend to build straight sides on their comb. European bees build curved comb.
    As far as a swarm, there is no way to tell the difference.
    What I do not understand is why the south of I-4 border line. If they came in from Texas, did they all move south of I-4? Does not make any sense to me.
    Like I said, I will continue to remove the swarms and hives out here at work and I will deal with it when I get any AHB, if I ever do.
    Robert
     
  12. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    i heaed the ones in florida hitched a ride on cargo ships to south florida....and its a mix of temp. An humidity that has been keeping them from hauling butt north....they like a certian mix....but according to a show on the discovery channel they are adapting to colder climates through mixing gene pools an going places they shouldnt be able to go....like Flagstaff in Arizona....take that with a grain of salt cause i seem to always get it half right....an im with you on the swarms....cutouts i spose are diffrent since they can be dangerous an you'll know soon enuff they arent EHB....in a hive in the bee yard it should know fairly soon an it just be a matter of requeening an killing any drones then useing the worker bees as slaves to rear the new colony...i wonder if the new queen would calm them down...ehhh....probly not :/
     
  13. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Yeah, it's creepy. Plus, he's so lame that he has a photo of a FLY on his webpage rather than a real bee. Shows you what a knowledgeable 'professional' he is.
     
  14. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    :goodpost:
    Good catch Omie, I didn't notice that, I was too busy looking at the forest to see the trees.

    I'm wondering if this was one of the clowns that was giving Zookeep so much trouble a couple weeks ago about retvieving feral swarms.
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Again Omie, impressive with the observation.

    On the website:
    The second sentence of his business description refers to a "honey bee infestation" a curious reference to what most would call a "colony".
    I figured it might go downhill from there, with "get rid of bees" being a common use of words.

    "Bee Removal requires a delicate touch, especially when the honey bees need to be removed from within your residential or commercial property".
    That video in the first post, that was some real "delicate" work being done there!

    Sorry if I am belabouring the rant!
     
  16. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    just to clarify something....the queens an the inspector has nothing to do with AHB i learned....its a queenbreeder/get charged for being one thing....they only want you to do 1 or 2 when you need them....more than that an i'll cost ya extra at inspection time.
     
  17. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    2kd:

    Are the queen breedeer and the inspector related?
     
  18. rast

    rast New Member

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    Nope Gunsmith, they are not related. In Fl., if you "manipulate" cell eggs to make queens, (grafting, etc.) other than splits, and let your inspector know, he is obligated to register you as a queen breeder and charge you as such. $25. more a couple of years ago.
     
  19. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Everyone is partially right. The state suggests destroying any feral colonies or swarms. Ferals and swarms that are kept should be requeened and isolated until the new workers predominate. Queens should be replaced annually with marked OR clipped queens from a tested EHB queen rearer. The state will not take your hive if it does test positive for AHB. They will encourage requeening with EHB stock.
    AHB came to Tampa first from Guatemala. They did not take the land route.
    AHB are not "sustainable" where there is 55 inches of rain evenly distributed through the year. They are not north of I-4 because of rain over 55 inches distributed through the year (except for the East Coast).
    Scutellata is a dominant gene. There is no weakened version, no half good hybrid, no gentle bee not likely to abscond and swarm four times as much.
    AHB are not sustainable at higher altitudes or where it freezes for extended periods. USDA has done a lot of research and data gathering over the decades AHB have been here.

    Behavior is not a good indicator of AHB. There are AHB hives that are reasonably docile with good inspection practices. Swarms are docile until they have a home to defend. EHB and almost any sub-species will become defensive when exposed to repeated threats from starvation, robbing, intruders (small hive beetles, skunks, bears, etc) two legged bears throwing rocks or beating on the hive or lighting brush fires, or anything threatening their survival.
    Bees are not indigenous to North America and history has shown the most successful sub-species were not from the same environmental region. Bro. Adam has a few good books on this observation. Swarms, feral hives and "survivor stock" are not a magic solution. Though a hive site may have existed for years, research shows that wild colonies rarely survive a year and are replaced by the next colony drawn to the site. What you have actually discovered are managed bees, that were poorly managed and swarmed to the feral site. If you want that trait, swarming, you are looking in the right place.
    I do encourage collecting all the bees you are able to. They are more likely to survive a year with any help at all than in the wild. Managed colonies do displace undesirable nectar gatherers. BTW Apis mellifera are honey gatherers. We raise Apis mellifica, nectar gatherers. Scientists will never correct the name though.
     
  20. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    ok...i love it when you do this ABK...i take like half of it in at a time...lol...an get the other half wrong....but this time ima copy it down some place.

    define ''feral'' for me....if there are no native honey bees (which is well known) then when does a managed colony that swarms become feral....it has to at some point cease to be domestic an become feral...if not then what is a feral honey bee and where did it come from...there is a colony of bees in an old owl box in hernando county by the gulf....i have personaly whatched this hive now for a couple of years an have never seen it empty...to be realistic i dont get to see it all that often but about 4 times a year...it has at least 3ft of open air comb below the bottom of the box which makes it a 5 ft long hive....i have put pics of it on here....do you consider these bees feral.

    also are you saying bees cannot ''adapt'' to be better suited to their enviroment (pests/eco system)....if thats true then i never have to worry about AHB comming here from tampa...i know this sounds like im disagreeing with you but im more trying to figure out what i've got backwards....the whole point to the discovery show i watched was how agressive they were (they were not being gental with the bees like a beekeeper would...but trying to make them mad to see how far and intensely they would chase them from the hive) an that they were adapting to the cold an moving north...the areas they were in did not get more than 55'' of rain...which fits....but they werent posta make a winter cluster either an they did...the inspector himself told me he caught AHB tested positive swarms in traps he set as far north as ocala...thats what...100 miles north of I-4....define sustainable...is that one colony in one hive for more than one consecutive season or swarms that build a hive an live only long enuff to swarm again an gain new teritory in that way....either way they are there unless a swarm can travel 100 miles on one tank of gas...where am i getting this mixed up at ???